Articles Posted in Title II Weapons

Vermont NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Title II Firearms sold by Class 3 FFLs that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of Title II or NFA firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the National Firearms Act.

In Vermont you can own the following items that are regulated the National Firearms Act

Washington NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Title II firearms (those sold by Class 3 SOT FFLs)  that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of Title II or NFA firearms.  These laws or restrictions are in addition to the compliance that is required with the National Firearms Act.

In Washington you can own the following items that are regulated the National Firearms Act:

Michigan NFA Class 3 firearms

There are several type of Title II firearms which are sold by Class 3 SOT dealers that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of Title II firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the National Firearms Act.

In Michigan you can own the following Title II Firearms that are regulated the the National Firearms Act:

Machine Guns
Suppressors
Any Other Weapon (AOW) (only some)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)  (See Below but Legal as of 3/28/14)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)  (See Below but Legal as of 3/28/14)

In Michigan you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.

 some AOW’s like Tasers or Stun Guns by private citizens whether or not they are class 3 items or the individual has a CCW permit

The Michigan State Police put together a legal update on SBR and SBS which describes the differences between those over 26 inches and those under 26 inches.
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Hawaii NFA Class 3 firearmsThere are several type of Title II firearms which are sold by Class 3 SOT FFLs that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of these Title II firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the National Firearms Act.

In Hawaii you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Individuals cannot own any NFA firearms which are kept within HI.

Many of you have asked your estate-planning lawyer about Gun Trusts and have not been able to find anyone who knows about them. This is not hard to believe because other than some materials I have produced or talked to others about there is no text book on gun trusts.

We work with lawyers in every state to help them prepare gun trusts for clients in their state while providing them a resource for the knowledge and information necessary to understand the ownership, transfer and possession of firearms.

In 2006, I recognized the need to create a Trust for NFA and regular firearms. It was at that time, that I created the Gun Trust. A Gun Trust is based on the traditional concepts of estate planning. Traditional trusts deal with all types of assets that are primarily financially based, but a Gun Trust only deals with firearms. They are not meant to circumvent federal or state laws, as many would have you believe. Trusts were clearly contemplated as owners of firearms by the National Firearms Act. The National Firearms Act (NFA), requires a tax to be paid to own, possess or transfer guns such as machine guns, short barreled rifles and shotguns, silencers or sound suppressors, and AOWs. They are referred to as Title 2 firearms because they are regulated under Title 2 of the 1968 Gun Control Act. Normal firearms are regulated under Title I of the Gun Control Act. Many people mistakenly call them Class 3 weapons, but Class 3 refers to a license or Special Occupational Tax (SOT) that an FFL must obtain prior to buying or selling Title II Firearms.

We have been telling 07 Manufactures for almost a year that they need to comply with ITAR even if they do not export anything. Now the according to Joshua Prince with the Prince Law Firm, In the November 2012 newsletter ATF has declared that all 07’s must register with the DDTC unless the DDTC specifically exempts them. The penalties are huge and include 20 years in prison and 1 million in fines among other civil penalties per violation.

So what ever your reason for not registering even if ATF previously told you not to, you need to register and register soon. If you need help with this please Contact Us and we will be happy to get you in touch with someone who can help you do this correctly.

We often get asked if one should put all of their firearms in a Gun Trust or not? Like most legal questions the answer is usually “it depends”. All of our Gun Trusts are designed to hold all of your firearms and any real gun trust should be designed for all of your firearms.

With that being said we have seen many documents marketed as gun trusts or NFA gun trusts that are not really designed for NFA much less any firearm. Some which appear to be designed for firearms strictly limit the property or assets that they can hold to NFA firearms.

This is a mistake and any trust you use to hold firearms should be designed to hold all types of firearms, ammunition, and other firearms related items like scopes or optics.

pistolstock.jpgWhile it is legal to add a Stock or a Folding Stock to a pistol, doing so will create a SBR which must be engraved and approved using an ATF Form 1 prior to doing so. In fact, having a stock and a pistol in close proximity with the present ability to configure it as an SBR could be constructive possession of an SBR. If you are planning on doing building an SBR, you should keep the stock in a separate location so that you are not charged with possession of an SBR without a valid tax stamp and approval to do so.
While SBRs are legal in many states, they are not legal in all states and you should check to see if possession or manufacturing a SBR is legal in your state.

NFA Class 3 firearmsThere are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In Missouri you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

In Missouri, you have previously needed to be an FFL to purchase Title II firearms from a Class 3 dealer. This may change soon as a new bill which is proposed to be effective on 8/28/11 would remove the FFL restriction. This means, you could use a Gun Trust to purchase NFA firearms. To read the bill follow this link.

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