Articles Posted in Machine Guns

North Carolina NFA Trust and Gun Trust Update:

In Dec 2014, a Gun Trust transfer of a Machine Gun was rejected by the ATF when it stated “In Accordance with NC General Statute 14-409. Please remember that your Form 4 must state a reason other than for scientific and/or experimentation or “in accordance with 14-409” to comply with The January 11, 2013 email from Dana Pickles. We are in the process of verifying this and will update this blog if anything changes.

A recent email from Dana Pickles at the US Dept. Of Justice Bureau of ATF NFA Branch stated the following changes for North Carolina

You need to timely dispute the ATF denial. ATF is denying these applications under 922 (O) (1)

Except as provided in paragraph (2), it shall be unlawful for any person to transfer or possess a machinegun.

But if you read the section 922 (O) (2) (A), the exception, states that:

a transfer to or by, or possession by or under the authority of, the United States or any department or agency thereof or a State, or a department, agency, or political subdivision thereof; or

We understand that ATF has approved a number of applications to permit Gun Trusts to manufacture machine guns and then rescinded the tax stamp to make the machine gun.

Many others have reported to us today that their Form 1 was disapproved by the ATF with the following reason:

Reasons For Disapproval

Based on the ATF letter requiring NICS checks for Trusts, the ATF may have accidentally opened the registry for new Machine Guns when registered in the name of a trust which is not a person under the GCA.

The Prince Law Blog quotes the same letter I wrote about a few days ago where the ATF determined that “Unlike individuals, corporations, partnerships, and associations; unincorporated trusts do not fall within the definition of “person” in the GCA.” And therefore, as a result,

Because unincorporated trusts are not “persons” under the GCA, a Federal firearms licensee (FFL) cannot transfer firearms to them without complying with the GCA. Thus, when an FFL transfers an NFA firearm to a trustee or other person acting on behalf of a trust, the transfer is made to this person as an individual (i.e., not as a trust). As the trustee or other person acting on behalf of the trust is not the approved transferee under the NFA, 18 U.S.C. 5812, the trustee or other person acting on behalf of a trust must undergo a NICS check. The individual must also be a resident of the same State as the FFL when receiving the firearm.

Michigan NFA Class 3 firearms

There are several type of Title II firearms which are sold by Class 3 SOT dealers that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of Title II firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the National Firearms Act.

In Michigan you can own the following Title II Firearms that are regulated the the National Firearms Act:

Machine Guns
Any Other Weapon (AOW) (only some)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)  (See Below but Legal as of 3/28/14)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)  (See Below but Legal as of 3/28/14)

In Michigan you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.

 some AOW’s like Tasers or Stun Guns by private citizens whether or not they are class 3 items or the individual has a CCW permit

The Michigan State Police put together a legal update on SBR and SBS which describes the differences between those over 26 inches and those under 26 inches.
Continue reading

Hawaii NFA Class 3 firearmsThere are several type of Title II firearms which are sold by Class 3 SOT FFLs that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of these Title II firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the National Firearms Act.

In Hawaii you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Individuals cannot own any NFA firearms which are kept within HI.

Mark Knapp a Washington Gun Trust Lawyer® and firearms lawyer has written a blog that deals with the possibility of obtaining a legal machine gun in the State of Washington.

Generally Machine guns have been illegal to import or transfer in Washington State since 1994 and then only those that were manufactured and registered with the NFA before the 1985 ban were permitted. Those who owned them prior to the 1994 Washington ban could keep them.

There seems to be some ambiguity in the law which may permit certain people to obtain certain Machine Guns. It would not be an easy process and would involved a WRIT OF MANDAMUS which Mark called a long shot.

A few weeks ago I purchased a fully transferable M16. Many of our clients have asked me to post some pictures of what this gun is being built into. Almost every replaceable part has been upgraded to the latest modern version while still keeping it legally transferable as a Pre 86 Machine Gun.

One of the first things we did was to replace the stock with a high-tech anti recoil Israeli Stock.


Next build a modern upper with a Side charger much like you would see on a AK47 so that you do not have to take your eye off the scope to load a bullet.

Yes, you can purchase a machine gun with a Gun Trust but you cannot purchase a new machine gun. (As long as it is purchase in a state where they are permitted) You may be wondering what the difference between and old machine gun and a new machine gun. As of May 1986 individuals, Trusts, and business entities can only purchase machine guns that were made and registered as transferable prior to May 19th of 1986.

A new M-16 can be purchased for $1200-1500, but can only be purchased by police or military, while a legally transferable pre 1986 Machine gun will cost you 10 times that amount.

So for those of you who are looking at a Gun Trust as a way to purchase an inexpensive machine gun, forget it. Not only is a machine gun expensive to buy, but its more expensive to feed. Many shoot 600-900 rounds per minute and the typical magazine will last a second or two.

One of the most common questions or misconceptions is regarding the ability to make a Machine Gun by using a Gun Trust. While you can make a Machine Gun with a Gun Trust, the process or the cost is not what most would consider acceptable. First you are not making a machine gun as you might expect using an ATF Form 1 but you must first start with a legally transferable pre 1986 full auto sear. This is in the 10-15K range and is by itself a Machine Gun. Now that you have a legal machine gun, you can modify almost anything and essentially create a new Machine Gun.

If you purchased a Pre 86 sear, you could change out the pins, add a left hand magazine release, change the trigger, and even build it into 300 blackout if you wanted. Once you were done, you would essentially have a new machine gun but it would be 10-15K more than what the police or military could purchase a current model.

So while you cannot technically “Make A Machine Gun” you can modify a legal transferable machine gun.

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