Articles Posted in Gun Trust Lawyer®

ATF has a history of approving Form 4 transfers to invalid trusts.  Today,  I received another example of an invalid trust that ATF had already approved a transfer for a suppressor.  As more people are learning about gun trust we are seeing more poorly written and in some cases invalid gun trusts.

Most invalid trusts are invalid because they do not name a beneficiary or someone lists themselves as the beneficiary. With the trust we received today, the trust did not meet the minimum signing requirements for the state where it was created.

I recently purchased a trust from a major suppressor manufacture, that had the same problem and while I live in Florida, the trust that was created online would would not be valid in Florida.  In addition, I made a typographical error entering the information and my repeated attempts to contact the company to fix the issue have been ignored.  For a company who prides themselves on customer service, this has been disappointing.   For the time being we would warn people to stay away from “easytrust” which is being advertised by a suppressor manufacture.  The trust  has many of the  problems associated with traditional trusts that can create liability for the trustees and beneficiaries of a poorly written gun trust and the one I received would not be valid in my state unlike their claims.

While talking with the client of the invalid trust, it turned out that he  had received the trust from a friend of his who told him it was prepared by a lawyer.  It would appear that the trust was not prepared by a licensed attorney or the lawyer was not familiar with trust law, gun law, or both.  A Gun Trust is very different than a revocable trust and one needs to consider each and every power and instruction in a trust and how they will interact with firearms owners and their desires to draft a well written gun trust.

With many online gun trusts popping up it is important to realize that a trust is not valid, nor is possession legal, just because the ATF approves a transfer.  If you have an invalid trust and are in possession of a firearm restricted by the NFA, you in violation of the NFA and could face both civil and criminal penalties.

A few benefits of a properly drafted Gun Trust include:

  1. The ability to tell your representatives how to properly transfer these firearms upon your death regardless of the state that they live in;
  2. The ability to move states and maintain a trust that is easily recognized as valid in other states;
  3. The ability to deal with co-trustees and beneficiaries in multiple states;
  4. The ability for your minor children to use the NFA firearms with adult supervision and parental consent;
  5. The ability to transfer assets to children, even below the age of 18, when they reach an appropriate age, while giving the someone the ability to make distribution decisions based on mental state,  physical location, legality of the transfer, and age;
  6. The ability to make unequal distributions so that firearms do not have to be liquidated to give equal distributions;
  7. The ability of the Trustee to refuse assets transferred by will or other means when  the NFA and state requirements are not complied with; Continue reading

In Florida, it is illegal for an individual to be on probation to own, possess, or use a firearm without permission of a Judge and his or her probation officer. While initially, this may sound reasonable because in our minds we tend to associate probation with criminals and felons, many of us do not realize that this also applies to those on probation for misdemeanor and driving offenses. Still don’t see a problem? What about a DUI or reckless driving charge? Did you know that you or your spouse could go to jail for owning, using, possessing, or having access to a firearm while on probation for a driving charge?

Most Jacksonville Criminal Defense Lawyers may not know to ask their clients about firearms in these circumstances and may be advising their clients incorrectly when charged with a DUI or reckless driving charge. A Gun Trust can be designed to manage your firearms without risk of loss and criminal prosecution while an individual or family member is on probation.

If you live in another state, you may check to see if the terms of probation include restrictions on ownership, transfer, possession, and use of firearms or weapons.

The best time to do this transfer is before your probation states. In most cases, it is not illegal to be in possession or transfer the firearms correctly while charged, but you should contact a Gun Trust Lawyer®, create a gun trust, and transfer your firearms into the Gun trust prior to probation.

While some may consider just lending their guns to others during probation, this will not solve your problem as you still own them and could be considered to have constructive possession over the firearms.

If you own Title II firearms, this may not be possible if you purchased them as an individual as a personal transfer can take 6 months or more to complete.

Today I ran across an entry on Nolo’s website addressing the appropriateness of using their living trust software, commonly referred to as Quicken, or Will Maker, to make a Gun Trust. The same issues would exist for Legal Zoom or other standard trust software. Thousands of people and many gun dealers have prepared gun trusts using Nolo’s software. The problem is the software was never designed for Gun Trusts and their trust may cause legal problems for their family and friends.

Nolo states:

Can I use a Nolo living trust to make a gun trust?

No. If you want to create a gun trust, get personalized legal advice from an expert on gun laws. Nolo living trusts are designed for the people who simply want to pass on their assets while avoiding probate. Gun trusts are complicated because they:

— may need to last for more than one generation — may have multiple trustees, and — must address both state and federal weapons laws.

Nolo’s living trusts do not address these issues, and so you should not use Nolo living trusts to transfer weapons. If you want to make a gun trust, get help from a lawyer who has plenty of experience with these trusts and state and federal weapons laws.

While Nolo’s webpage does not address many of the issues to use a real Gun Trust, they have finally addressed the issue clearly. NO you should not use Nolo’s software to create a Gun Trust. We have been telling people this for years and now Nolo has addressed the issue to help people avoid the problems that using their product could create. If you have, we can help you modify your trust into a proper Gun Trust with the help of a Gun Trust Lawyer® licensed in your state.

Updated 8/21

I recently published an article on Gun Trusts and an amazing 1 day approval. I felt that this was an unusual circumstance and decided to submit an electronic ATF Form 1 back on July 26th using my personal Gun Trust to test out the current time for approvals on using a Trust from a Gun Trust Lawyer®.

While I was not surprised to have not received an approval on July 27th, I have been checking the status regularly. I was surprised to receive an approval early Saturday morning August 2, 2014. This approval was not anywhere as quick as our clients 1 day approval, but only took 35 days to get approved which is amazing considering that many are reporting 9-14 months for a paper approvals. Not only was the approval quick, but the email notification came with an attachment which contained a copy of my Form 1. The process for printing the approval was more complex than it needed to be and I guess that the ATF decided they could cut down on the amount of communication and support by just sending a copy. A wise move by the ATF.

Please let us know about your approval times so we can see if others are experiencing similar results.

Keeping Your Personal Representative or Executor Out of Jail
If you own firearms, you should reevaluate the trustees, successor trustees and beneficiaries in any estate planning documents. It is important to avoid people who are prohibited people from owning or being in possession of firearms and ammunition.

Many people do not even know that they may be a prohibited person. There is not an easy way to determine if someone named in your documents is a prohibited person or not without asking them a bunch of questions. In addition, certain items you may own may be illegal in some states and even if the person is not prohibited, it may be a crime for them to take these items to a location where they are prohibited.

If you own any firearms, you need to be careful to avoid potentially serious problems with your family and friends.

Under Federal Law the mere possession of any type of firearm or ammunition by a “prohibited person” is a crime. There is no exception for Executors, Personal Representatives, or Trustees. Upon accepting his or her appointment, an Executor, Personal Representative, or Trustee may become a criminal. The Federal Statutes contain a long list of things that make someone a prohibited person including: conviction in any court of a crime punishable by more than a year in prison; being an unlawful drug user (even if legal in the state); having been discharged from the Armed Forces under dishonorable conditions and having been convicted of a misdemeanor where the charge was one involving domestic violence.

NFA Firearms are sold by Class 3 SOT dealers and include machine guns, short-barreled rifles and shotguns, Suppressors, AOWs and certain other items are subject to the National Firearms Act. Even deactivated war trophies can still be under the NFA. The mere possession of these items by anyone not having the appropriate documentation (not just convicted criminals) is a federal crime. Ignorance of the law is not a defense.

Without proper authorization and documentation to be in possession of these items makes them contraband and is a crime. In many states possession of regular “Assault Weapons” is a crime and can subject you to criminal prosecution.

If you own firearms, it is important to review your estate planning documents with a Gun Trust Lawyer® to help ensure that they are dealt with properly in the event of your death or disability. Many traditional trusts or wills instruct your family and friends to take actions that are illegal when it comes to the possession and transfer of firearms.

For those of you who have been thinking about purchasing a Gun Trust we are offering specials on the Base, Advanced, and Professional Gun Trusts.

The Base Gun Trust which you create yourself online and does not come with legal support retails for $349 and has been on sale before for as low as $199 but you can purchase a prepaid code for only $149.

The Advanced Gun Trust is designed for the person who wants a Gun Trust created and customized by an attorney for their specific family circumstances and desires. The Advanced Gun Trust provides the ability to communicate with an attorney regarding federal and state specific issues without any additional costs. Because your specific situation is considered when creating this trust, the Advanced and Professional versions of the Gun Trust can help minimize the potential effects of future legislative and or tax changes that may be associated with transfers during you life and after your death. The Advanced Gun Trust is a revocable trust and very easy to change. Use of this Gun Trust will require a transfer of the firearms at some point after your death. The local attorney’s fees and telephone and email support are included in this Gun Trust and the normal price on this trust is between $600 and $750 depending on the state you live in. You can purcahse the Advanced Trust today for the special price of $495
The Professional Gun Trust is our most sophisticated Gun Trust. It is a multi generational, asset protection gun trust that can remain the owner of your firearms forever. This Gun Trust allows future generations to manage and use the firearms without subjecting them to future ATF transfer taxes or claims of creditors. With the current bills before congress many people are concerned about being able to allow their children or beneficiaries to receive the firearms they own. This trust includes the ArmsGuard™ Protector which allows the trust to be changed in the future to deal with future legislative changes that may attempt to restrict rights or the way the Professional Gun Trust works. If laws change next week or 300 years from now, an ArmsGuard™ Protector can be appointed and modify the terms to continue to try and achieve your goals to the extent possible.

The Professional Gun Trust is normally $2500 but you can purchase it today for the special price of $1699. These prices are only available using your credit card or paypal with the buy it now button below. Simply select the trust you want and click the Buy Now Button.

Gun Trust options
Base Gun Trust Prepaid Code for $149.00 USD
Advanced Gun Trust $495.00 USD
Professional Gun Trust $1,699.00 USD

IMI SBR Right Side.jpg

If you have been thinking of buying an SBR, now is the time to do it before the ATF changes the CLEO requirements. On Monday September 9th ATF will be publishing proposed changes to the CLEO requirements for Gun Trusts and changes are expected after the expiration of the 90 day comment period.

I have personally purchased one of these guns and am awaiting approval from the ATF.

This special is good while supplies last. Currently there are 1500 units in stock and ready to ship.

This is an incredible deal on a SBR for our Clients. This gun uses IMI Parts ( Israel Military Industries). The IMI parts are M16 Nickel Baron bolt carrier group, Flip up gas block sight with quick deployment points on both sides, 7 1/4 polymer quad rail with QD attachment on the bottom front, MilSpec trigger parts group, Buffer Tube with 6 position stops, buffer, and buffer spring. This SBR is manufactured by GPI in Jacksonville using the GPI 7075 Precision ambi marked lower receiver. Bullet pictograms with save, semi, and auto, black type 3 anodize matching precision 7075 A3 flat top upper, also type 3 anodized.

Standard Features also include:

  • GPI QD stock place – picture below
  • Billet winter trigger guard
  • 11.5 inch 1/9 twist, 4150 CMV match barrel with 1/2 x 28 standard threads.
  • A2 Flash hider

Riffle comes complete with 1 IMI 30 round Battle Magazine, This bundle include engraving of your Trust Name meeting ATF requirements, the $999 Price include a Base Gun Trust, and Form 4 for those who pick up from GPI in Jacksonville or Form 3 to your local dealer included.

$899 for Package for our existing gun trust clients or
$999 including a Base Gun Trust which can be upgraded to our Advanced or Professional Trust.

Up to 10 additional IMI battle Magazines can be purchased for $12 each with each firearm.

LE price on this gun without ATF paperwork, engraving, or Gun Trust is $1375 Retail price with everything is $1795
Place your order by sending and email to or calling (904) 425-2791.

Click the link below for additional images Continue reading

A NFA Trust or Gun Trust is a type of revocable living trust that is created for the main purpose of possessing Title II firearms. In our review of many so-called Gun Trusts we have seen that most do not properly address firearms ownership, transfer and possession. (If you have a gun trust you would like reviewed, just let us know and we woudl be happy to review it under the federal laws for free) Many are regular trusts and many only have a few firearms related terms. If almost every provision in your trust does not deal with firearms, it is not a real Gun Trust from a Gun Trust Lawyer®.

A Gun Trust is a NFA Trust that is appropriate for regular firearms as well as Title II firearms (those sold by Class 3 SOT FFLs). Often times, people who wish to purchase Title II firearms with a trust choose to hire an attorney who has not studied and does not fully understand the NFA and estate planning. As a result, many so called NFA Trusts or Gun Trusts other than those provided by a Gun Trust Lawyer® do not comply with the Gun Control act of 1968, the National Firearms Act and other local and state specific gun laws. These trusts often contain several defects or mistakes and may lead to illegal possession or transfer of Title I and Title II firearms.

Mistake #1: Omitted Necessary Provisions

A generic revocable trust often times does not contain necessary provisions that are necessary for the possession of Title I or Title II firearms. A real Gun Trust should mention several provisions, including but not limited to: National Firearms Act (NFA), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF or BATFE), ATF Form 1, Form 4, Form 5320.20, Title II firearms, prohibited persons, etc. An experienced Gun Trust Lawyer® will insert and define these terms into a Gun Trust to meet important requirements that are unique to Gun Trusts.

Mistake #2: Failure to include required provisions or execute the Gun Trust properly

Each state has its own requirements to create a valid Trust. While this is a Gun Trust it will have to be executed with the formalities required for type of trust that is used. Many states have signing requirements and these can differ depending on if the trust is revocable or irrevocable. In addition, it may be difficult for the ATF to recognize the trust as valid if one moves or the trust is attempted to be used from different states in the future. It is important to create the trust with the requirements necessary for ATF approval in each state to prevent problems in the future.

Mistake #3: The Trustee or Beneficiary is a Prohibited Person

Under the NFA, a “prohibited person” cannot own or possess any firearms. Thus, it is important that a valid Gun Trust not only mentions prohibited persons but also defines them so that future managers of the trust can easily identify illegal transfers. Your Gun Trust should make it impossible to appoint a prohibited person as a Trustee and properly deal with a beneficiary who is or later becomes a prohibited person so that you do not put your family or friends at risk or criminal prosecution. In addition, the state where the beneficiary lives at the time of your death, which is unknown at this time, must be dealt with to prevent firearms from being sent to a state where they are not legal.

Mistake #4: Title II Firearms Have Not Been Properly Transferred to the Gun Trust

A Gun Trust cannot legally own a firearm unless it is legally transferred into the trust. Simply signing a trust agreement does not transfer ownership of a firearm to a trust. A firearm must be transferred from the current owner, to the Gun Trust, according to applicable state and federal law. Opening a bank account in the name of the Gun Trust, and purchasing Title II firearms with the trust’s funds (by using a check or debit card from the Gun Trust’s checking account) is a simple way to ensure that the trust, and not you, owns the firearm(s). Your gun trust should be able to deal with the ability for you to purchase the firearms with personal funds and properly document the purchase so that invalid transfers do not take place. Our Gun Trusts come with the forms and instructions to help you properly purchase and transfer firearms to your Gun Trust. You should never use your own personal funds to purchase Title II firearms without proper documentation that it was done on behalf of you as Trustee of the Gun Trust as this can lead to the illegal possession of the firearms by co-trustees of the Gun Trust.

Mistake #5: The Gun Trust Allows a Beneficiary to Possess Title II Firearms

The majority of revocable living trusts or so called Gun Trusts allow beneficiaries and or other people to use, possess, and receive distributions of trust assets. A properly drafted Gun Trust prohibits a person who is a mere beneficiary from using or possessing a Title II Firearm. Only trustees or legally eligible authorized users under the terms of a Gun Trust have the legal right to use and possess Title II firearms owned by the trust.

The ATF changes the rules and interpretation of the NFA all the time. It is important to use a Gun Trust Lawyer® who keeps up with the changes and will not charge you every time you have a call or question regarding how to use your trust properly. Gun Trust Lawyers® will answer questions this week, next month, or next year about your trust free of charge. The unlimited support is include with your legally supported Gun Trust so you do not have to worry about future legal charges for questions or the next time ATF changes their procedure.

We have created over 5000 Gun Trusts for clients all over the country and work with lawyers in each state to have state specific issues dealt with. Today with families being located in multiple states and not knowing where your beneficiaries will live when you die, it is more important than ever to have your Gun Trust deal with multi state issues correctly. To find out more about Gun Trusts request information using our contact us form on this page or call us to begin the process.

Many of you have asked your estate-planning lawyer about Gun Trusts and have not been able to find anyone who knows about them. This is not hard to believe because other than some materials I have produced or talked to others about there is no text book on gun trusts.

We work with lawyers in every state to help them prepare gun trusts for clients in their state while providing them a resource for the knowledge and information necessary to understand the ownership, transfer and possession of firearms.

In 2006, I recognized the need to create a Trust for NFA and regular firearms. It was at that time, that I created the Gun Trust. A Gun Trust is based on the traditional concepts of estate planning. Traditional trusts deal with all types of assets that are primarily financially based, but a Gun Trust only deals with firearms. They are not meant to circumvent federal or state laws, as many would have you believe. Trusts were clearly contemplated as owners of firearms by the National Firearms Act. The National Firearms Act (NFA), requires a tax to be paid to own, possess or transfer guns such as machine guns, short barreled rifles and shotguns, silencers or sound suppressors, and AOWs. They are referred to as Title 2 firearms because they are regulated under Title 2 of the 1968 Gun Control Act. Normal firearms are regulated under Title I of the Gun Control Act. Many people mistakenly call them Class 3 weapons, but Class 3 refers to a license or Special Occupational Tax (SOT) that an FFL must obtain prior to buying or selling Title II Firearms.

History of the National Firearms Act

The NFA was passed in 1934 in response to the criminal activity of the time. It imposed a $200 tax on certain firearms thought to be contributing to the growing crime problem. In an effort to discourage the possession of these types of firearms, individuals were required to register them with the government and pay a tax of $200. Once this tax is paid, the owner will receive a Tax Stamp for the $200 that needs to be kept with the firearm. This tax stamp identifies the owner who is permitted to be in possession, and in what state the firearm can be located. Later the NFA was amended to further restrict certain items called Any Other Weapons ( an “AOW”). The tax to purchase an AOW was only $5 but to build one the tax was the same $200 as with other Title II firearms.

The NFA was designed to have strict requirements and carries stiff penalties for violations. Only an individual, business entity, or trust may own a Title II firearm in the civilian community. In addition, only the owner or their representative may be in possession of that firearm. Illegal possession, transfer, or ownership of a Title II firearm carries a prison sentence of up to 10 years, a fine of up to $250,000, loss of the firearms, and loss of the vessel (vehicle, or home) that the illegal firearms were contained. The NFA defines possession to include loaning so it is important to understand the concept of constructive possession and why individual ownership poses many risks to the average family. Many people mistakenly believe it is ok to let someone else use their Title II firearm if they are close buy, inside a closed fence, hand is on their left solder, or can see them. Even if these were permitted, imagine bringing a silencer home from a gunsmith or range. While you are on the phone your spouse grab your keys to go shopping. Surely you would not believe that this was permitted transfer or possession of a Title II firearm without pre-approval and paying the Tax. A Gun Trust can help protect and manage Title II firearms from these common issues.

ATF Requirements

Title 2 firearms must be registered with the ATF through application process. Whether you are purchasing a Firearm from a dealer with a Class 3 SOT or building your own Title II firearms, you must first go pay and obtain approval from the ATF to have it transferred or to build the firearm. For an individual the ATF requires that you fill out the appropriate form, affix a two-by-two inch photograph of yourself along with fingerprints, and have the application signed by your local chief law enforcement officer (the “CLEO”) In addition you must include the tax fee which is typically $200 for each Title II firearm. Once the application is approved the person or entity who submitted the application will receive notice and the firearm may then be created or transferred. The approval time may take anywhere from three to six months.

The NFA Gun Trust

NFA gun trusts have become popular in recent years as an alternative to individual registration because of the flexibility they offer after the firearm is purchase as well as not requiring the photos, fingerprints, or CLEO signature. The Gun Trust can allow other managers or trustees of the trust to uses the firearms. State law controls the formalities of creating a trust and while in some cases lesser formalities may be required, it is recommended that you comply with the formalities other states to simplify the process and authorization in the case that you or others involved with the trust do not live in the same state where the trust was created. There are basically four types of people or entities that are involved with a Gun Trust: grantor/settlor, trustee, successor trustee and beneficiary.

The grantor or settlor is the person who creates the Gun Trust to manage who and how and when others will have access to or can use firearms within the Trust. A Trustee will submit the application to ATF but instead of registering the firearm in their name, he or she will list the Gun Trust as the owner. Trustees are also the individuals who will hold the trust property for one set of people during the grantor’s life and the beneficiaries after the death of the grantor. Trustees may legally possess NFA weapons in the trust even though they are not listed on the application. In most cases a Trustee should be at least 18 years old (federal law prohibits anyone under 18 buying NFA firearms, and anyone under 21 from purchasing NFA firearms from a FFL with a Class 3 SOT) and not be otherwise prohibited from possessing firearms. A well drafted Gun Trust Lawyer® can craft provisions to allow for minor children to use the firearms with adult supervision. The beneficiary is the individual who receives the trust property upon the occurrence of a defined event that is often the death of the grantor. A well-drafted gun trust will deal with the many issues that arise in the event that one of the beneficiaries is a minor child, immature, or a prohibited person at the time the grantor dies.

Advantages of a Gun Trust

Gun Trusts should be very flexible. While most are established as a revocable trusts there are many advantages to using an irrevocable trust that are not available to a Gun Trust that is revocable. While many irrevocable trust have significant disadvantages, it is possible to intentionally violate tax code and remove the disadvantages. This type of trust is called an intentionally defective irrevocable trust.

Another advantage is that a Gun Trust does not require the Fingerprints, photographs, and CLEO approval. Not only can this speed up the process, but it also is more private.

While business entities have some of the same benefits as a Trust, they often involve yearly expenses, formalities, and are not designed to deal with ownership, transfer, possession, and use of firearms like a Gun Trust.

While many Gun Trusts are not designed to protect your firearms for generations or from creditors of yourself or your family, there is a Professional version of the Gun Trust that is designed to do both. If you are concerned about giving children and future family members that ability to use firearms if it should become illegal to transfer these firearms later or what to protect your guns from creditors, you should ask about the Multi-Generational Asset Protection Gun Trust.

Top 12 signs that you may not have a real gun trust.

1) You were told to put only NFA firearms in your trust 2) Your Trust talks about real estate, stocks, your house, and guardians of children 3) Your trust instructs others to break the law if you become incapacitated or die.
4) Your trust allows You to dissolve your trust without any prior actions 5) Co-Trustees are listed right in your trust document 6) Your Trust uses a Schedule A 7) Your Trust requires the sale of your firearms to pay you income if I become incapacitated.
8) Your trust does not specifically allow for the purchase of firearms in the powers 9) Your trust does not mention guns, the NFA, Title II, Prohibited Persons, or uses incorrect terms like Class 3 firearms.
10) Your trust did not come with an extensive manual and how to section describing almost everything you could possibly think of.
11) You were told the Gun Trust was designed to circumvent laws.
12) Your trust does not contain a Copyright by Gun Trust Lawyer® David M. Goldman
For more information on whether a NFA Gun Trust or Gun Trust makes sense for your circumstances, use the contact form on this page to receive more information on Gun Trusts.

How can a Gun Trust protect my guns for my children and other family members?

Recently we have had many inquires as to how a Gun Trust can be used to protect firearms from future or currently pending legislation. First let me say that while no previous gun law has taken away the current owners rights, there is no guarantee that a future law would not attempt to do so. In other words, no one can guarantee you what will happen in the future. If we look at the firearms restrictions that have been imposed on US citizens over the last 200 years we see that all legislation has been designed to restrict future purchases and transfers of firearms and even attempts to totally ban firearms have allowed those who already possess them to keep their guns.

All of our Gun Trusts are designed to own regular and NFA firearms including the so-called “Assault Weapons”. Our lower end trusts are based on revocable trusts that will end at sometime after the death of the person who creates it. We do have a Professional gun trust which is designed to offer both asset protection and multi generational ownership of the firearms.

Historically a trust can only have a limited lifetime which is controlled by state law. The Rule Against perpetuity is a limiting factor that dates back to England and attempts to restrict the ability to control from the grave. The modern trend in the United State has been to increase the length of time you can control and in some states the restrictions have been abolished.

For example in Texas a trust can last 90 years after the death of the last person named in the trust dies, in Florida a trust can last 360 years, Arizona 500 years, Colorado 1000 years. In some states like Alaska, Idaho, New Jersey, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and South Dakota trusts can last forever.

The good news is that even if you do not live in one of the states that has expanded or abolished the Rule Against perpetuity, our Professional Gun Trust allows for you to elect to change the rules of your trust to follow another state at the time you create it or a later time. This means your Professional Gun Trust will be the owner of all of your firearms forever and children, grandchildren and beyond will be the authorized users of the firearms.

The Asset Protection Gun Trust is designed for the firearms owner or collector that is concerned about liability from their profession or personal life that may cause the loss of the firearms. In addition this Gun Trust can be structured for multi-generational use so that your kids, grandchildren, and future generations can use the same trust and have the same protections. The Multi-Generational Asset Protection Gun Trust uses Asset Protection techniques that can protect the firearms and other assets in the trust from your creditors as well as the creditors of your beneficiaries. Because of the complexity and cost involved with this trust, it has historically only made sense for those with $20K in firearms or where the individual desires for the trust to exist for future generations.

This Gun Trust is not designed for everyone. If you have a larger gun collection or keeping them in an asset protection vehicle so that future family members can use them is important than this Professional Version of our Gun Trust may be right for you and your family.

For those of you just looking for a good Gun Trust for NFA firearms and regular firearms without legal support you may check out the online form version. This Gun Trust comes with great instructions and a users copyrighted users guide. It is also designed for all of your firearms but at a lower price because it does not come with legal support. It can be found at

While the prices and protections vary by state, here are some of the more significant differences in the trusts we offer with legal support that would be customized by a Gun Trust Lawyer® who is licensed in your state:

Feature Advanced Professional
Price $600-$750 $2500-3000
Created by Gun Trust Lawyer® Yes Yes
Customized for you by Lawyers Yes Yes
Ability to act without others Yes Yes
Special Veto Powers Yes Yes
Protect Guns For Children
Grandchildren and beyond
No Yes
Asset Protection – Protects guns from:
– Your creditors No Yes
– Your beneficiaries creditors Some Yes
– Lawsuits Against You No Yes
– Bankruptcy No Yes
– Divorce No Yes (if spouse signs waiver)
– Disqualifying you from
No Yes

Ability to change beneficiaries

Yes Yes

Authorized Users (included)

15 Unlimited
No EIN or Separate Taxes Yes Yes
Multiple Beneficiaries Yes Yes
Charitable Gifts to NRA Yes Yes
Multi State Users Yes Yes
Multi State Use Yes Yes
Multiple Owners Yes
Multiple Trustee Levels No Yes
Good for all Firearms Yes Yes
Form to Add Trustees No Included
Form to Remove Trustees No Included
Form to change States No Included
Form to allow for self
expiring Trustee
No Included

Asset Protection does not protect from fraudulent conveyance or fraudulent transfers. Divorce and Bankruptcy protections vary by state. All protections are not available in all cases and how a trust is structured will determine the protections available. The Professional version of the Gun Trust does not permit you to change the beneficiary to yourself.

If you are interested in a Professional Gun Trust to own and protect your firearms for generations as well as protecting them from your creditors and those of your beneficiaries, Contact Us to create one before the laws change and you may not be able to transfer your firearms into a Gun Trust.

If you already have a Gun Trust, it can be upgraded to the Professional Gun Trust your previous investment will not be lost. We are currently reducing the price by what you previously paid to any Gun Trust Lawyer®.

Contact Information