Ohio NFA Class 3 firearms
In Ohio a NFA Trust or Gun Trusts can own all types of firearms including those regulated by the NFA.

There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of Title II firearms – (Those sold by FFLs with a Class 3 SOT) in addition to the compliance that is required with the National Firearms Act.

Yesterday, I decided to try out the ATFonline.gov Eforms submission. I found the process very easy to do and while a little confusing the first time, it seems rather intuitive. Below are the steps I followed:

  1. Register for an account at ATFonline.gov. The system is very picky and must be used with IE 8 or a recent version of Safari on OS X. Sorry no Firefox, Chrome, or even IE 7.
  2. Log in.
  3. Select the Form 1. Better to use the bar and move it with the mouse, it is very difficult to scroll through the forms. ATF needs to switch this to a drop down menu.
  4. Application – this is where you state whether you are tax exempt or will be paying a tax.
  5. Applicant – Select that you are not a FFL and then complete your information. You should list the Trust name as the Licensee / Permitee Name.applicant.jpg
  6. Add line items. You can use one application for multiple items. I choose to only do one SBR. It walked me through the process of selecting the manufacture from a list.line-item.jpg
  7. Upload electronic documents. This is where I uploaded my scanned Gun Trust Documents.upload.jpg
  8. Certify that Under Penalties of Perjury, I Declare that I have examined this application, including accompanying documents, and to the best of my knowledge and belief it is true, accurate and complete and the making and possession of the firearm described above would not constitute a violation of Chapter 44, Title 18, U.S.C., Chapter 53, Title 26, U.S.C., or any provisions of State or local law.
  9. Enter credit card payment information
  10. Sign and Submit. By clicking a check box, your application will be submitted.

Within a few minutes I received a confirmation email showing that I had submitted my application and it was Pending Research because the manufacture I had selected was not listed in their database. This morning I received a new update saying that my status was changed to Submitted/In Process. I will keep updating this blog as I receive more information but it already feels faster than the paper system.

introduction-to-gun-trusts.pngNFA GUN TRUST CLE

I have been asked to teach a CLE on Gun Trusts on September 11, 2013 for LawReview CLE.

Traditional estate planning can be problematic when dealing with firearms. This course will explain how a Gun Trust is designed to acquire, manage, use, and transfer firearms, including those restricted by the National Firearms Act of 1934.

David Goldman will be facilitating a discussion at Elder Concert 2013. Elder Concert is a statewide conference for the elder care professionals that is presented by the Academy of Florida Elder Law Attorneys, the Elder Law Section of the Florida Bar, Florida Department of Elder Affairs, the Florida State Guardianship Association, the Florida Geriatric Care Managers Association, Florida Atlantic University and the University of South Florida.

‘Bequesting a Felony – Geriatrics and Guns’ will take place on Saturday, September 21, 2013 from 10:45am to 12:00pm in Boca Raton and on Friday, October 11, 2013 from 1:30pm to 2:45pm in Tampa.

Obama reported to sign UN Gun Treaty while Congress is on Vacation:

Obama.jpgJay Carney said Obama will sign the UN Arms Trade Treaty “before the end of August…We believe it’s in the interest of the United States.”

I have previously written on how the UN Arms Treaty can prohibit the future transfer of firearms for citizens of the United States. For the Treaty to become effective it must be ratified by the U.S. Senate. This requires 67 votes. You should contact your Senator and let them know you do not want them to approve the UN Arms Trade Treaty also known as the UN Gun Treaty.

California NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In California you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

North Carolina will become the next state to legalize hunting with a suppressor. As of 10/1/2013, a suppressor will be legal to use on firearms while hunting. The NC Wildlife Resource Commission made the changes which are not found in the NC statutes and also not found in the in the NC Hunting Regulations which were printed before the legislation passed. Here is a link to the legislation as well as the press release. If you plan on hunting in NC after October 1, 2013, I would suggest keeping a copy of the legislation and press release with you as many police officers may not know that it will be legal to hunt with a suppressor after 10/1/2013.

Every time a state legalizes hunting with a suppressor, the sales of suppressors in that state dramatically increase which creates a longer approval wait time. Given that current approval times in most states is more than 6 months. it would be advisable to purchase your silencer now if you have any plans on hunting with a silencer in 2014. Remember that if you use a Gun Trust, you do not have to obtain your local sheriff’s permission to purchase a silencer as well as creating the flexibility to have multiple authorized users. There are many things that are different with Title II firearms (like suppressors) and it would be a good idea to request our free report on What is a Gun Trust and Why you might need one.

Last week I called the ATF to check on one of my personal applications and a new one that I recently filed. The person I spoke to told me that while older applications were taking 6-9 months, new applications were expected to take 9-12 months for approval.

The Firearmsblog has reported a similar conversation with ATF.

While we had previously reported that the ATF was increasing their staff by 30% it appears that this has not helped clear the backlog and they are more than 46,000 applications in the backlog.

A NFA Trust or Gun Trust is a type of revocable living trust that is created for the main purpose of possessing Title II firearms. In our review of many so-called Gun Trusts we have seen that most do not properly address firearms ownership, transfer and possession. (If you have a gun trust you would like reviewed, just let us know and we woudl be happy to review it under the federal laws for free) Many are regular trusts and many only have a few firearms related terms. If almost every provision in your trust does not deal with firearms, it is not a real Gun Trust from a Gun Trust Lawyer®.

A Gun Trust is a NFA Trust that is appropriate for regular firearms as well as Title II firearms (those sold by Class 3 SOT FFLs). Often times, people who wish to purchase Title II firearms with a trust choose to hire an attorney who has not studied and does not fully understand the NFA and estate planning. As a result, many so called NFA Trusts or Gun Trusts other than those provided by a Gun Trust Lawyer® do not comply with the Gun Control act of 1968, the National Firearms Act and other local and state specific gun laws. These trusts often contain several defects or mistakes and may lead to illegal possession or transfer of Title I and Title II firearms.

Mistake #1: Omitted Necessary Provisions

ATFonline.jpgFFL holders: get on it so you’re squared away for your customers!

Gun Trusts can use this to submit an ATF Form 1 – 5320.1

“NFA eForms are finally here! ATF is pleased to announce the implementation of the NFA forms into ATF’s eForms system. ATF Forms 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9 and 10 are currently available for eForms submission.

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