Articles Posted in Assault Weapons Trust

Many people are concerned about the ability to change the terms of their trust after they die or the Trust it becomes irrevocable. Our Professional Gun Trust no comes with an ArmsGuard™ Protector that allows for the terms of you trust to change if laws change in the future.

This means that if the local, state, or federal government changes a law dealing with firearms and your rights, your trust can be changed to deal with the changes even if the change is 300 years from now. If you have firearms and it is important to preserve them for future generations and keep creditors from being able to reach the firearms you should Contact Us to create a Gun Trust with the ArmsGuard™ Protector.

Remember it is important to have your firearms and magazines transferred to your Gun Trust before laws change. The ArmsGuard™ Protector can only work for items within the Gun Trust. Many states and the federal government now have bills before congress seeking to restrict our gun rights and the ability for future transfers. If these bills become laws, like recently happened in NY, you may not have the ability to buy, sell, or give firearms to your spouse or children. Some states have already passed laws which restrict the transfer of certain items so it is important to speak with a Gun Trust Lawyer® in your state.

Lawyers in other states are always asking where they can learn about NFA Trusts and Gun Trusts. Here is an opportunity to learn about advanced planning with gun trusts for your clients.

I have been asked by the American Bar Association to present a CLE which will be available to lawyers and non-lawyers on the use of Gun Trusts to protect firearms from changes in future legislation. For those who are not familiar it was the ABA Journal that wrote an article on my a few years ago about the creation of a new area of legal practice dealing with Gun Trusts The print version of the article was In Goldmans Guns Trust and an online version is available under Florida lawyer Fashions Gun Trust (And Niche Practice).

Brief Program Description:

Wile many of our past Presidents have strongly supported our 2nd Amendment rights, our current President seems to want to restrict our rights. In honor of those who value our 2nd Amendment rights we are offering the following special.

If you are one of the many responsible gun owners who are interested in creating a Gun Trust to help protect and manage your firearms. We have created easy to use online system that creates a valid multi state Gun Trust for all of your guns, magazines, and firearms accessories. This NFA Gun Trust is also designed to purchase and manage Title II firearms that are sold by Class 3 dealers. In most states you will no longer need your CLEO to agree to let you exercise your rights to own NFA firearms.

This special anywhere from 1/2 to 1/3 off of the normal price of the Gun Trust with legal support. This special is for the Online Gun Trust and comes with very detailed instructions and examples including hyper-links to sample ATF Forms including Form 4, Form 1 and Form 20 which are used to purchase, make, and transport Title II firearms (Those restricted by the NFA). This Trust form can deal with people who live in multiple states and allow you to add additional authorized users to protect your family and friends from issues of constructive possession.

As Obama was running for President he claims he will not take our guns away. Now it seems that the only way we may be able to protect our guns against future legislation he will likely sign may be to put our guns in a Gun Trust.

Thanks to the JFPO for bringing this video to our attention. Perhaps it’s not what he says but what he obviously doesn’t say. Obama said nothing about high-capacity magazines, semi-auto pistols, nor semi-auto guns like the AR15. I am sure he will find a way to reconcile his words with his actions.

While there is no actual Assault Weapon Ban, we are being asked many questions about regular firearms and the benefits of a Gun Trust. As laws may change or what is proposed may be different from what actually happens, the answers below be reviewed with your local Gun Trust Lawyer® and we should all re-evaluate the situation when things become more certain.

Should I put my regular firearms in a Gun Trust?

Yes all firearms, accessories, and magazines should be put in a Gun Trust and the sooner you do it the more flexible your choices will be. A risk is that future transfers of certain guns (sounds like most guns) will be prohibited. If this happens you will not be able to transfer them to a Gun Trust. In addition, there are many other reasons why you should have your regular firearms in a Gun Trust See this article on putting Title I firearms in a NFA or Gun Trust.

A Gun Trust is designed for all of your firearms even if you do not have any Title II firearms. Title II firearms are sold by Class 3 Dealers and include Silencers, Short barreled rifles and shotguns, AOWs, DDs and full automatic pistols and rifles.

While it is not necessary under the current laws (2012) to have a Gun Trust to allow others to use or be in possession of your firearms, there are rumors that many firearms that are currently classified as TItle I firearms may become Title II firearms and controlled under the National Firearms Act. If this happens we will all have to be careful about constructive possession and may lose the ability to transfer these firearms to others, may have to pay a transfer fee to transfer them to others, or may lose them upon our death.

A Gun Trust can allow you to allow others to have access to your firearms and even become the person in control of them after you die. While a regular Gun Trust can your beneficiaries to use and have access to the firearms there is a risk that the people who would receive the benefit after your death may not be able to actually realize the full benefits from the value of your guns.

Today the ATF announced that a Laredo man was sentenced to 10 years for the illegal possession of a firearm. It is important to understand who can and who cannot own, possess, or use firearms whether they are Title I or Title II firearms. Just because you might not consider a silencer a firearm, its possession is limited in the same way a regular pistol is. While there is not official duty to ask if someone is prohibited, its wise to do so because not only is the possession of an item subject to the NFA regulated, but the transfer (handing it to them or allowing them to have access to it) is also regulated and could subject each of you to 10 years in jail and up to a $250,000 penalty per occurrence.

Our NFA Gun Trusts ( the basic and the new asset protection firearms trust) both allow the people involved with your trust to understand who is prohibited and who is not. Often people do not even know that they have lost their firearms rights and it is important to have them understand when they are a prohibited person as well as allow you to know whether a family member or friend is prohibited now and in the future.

If you would like to discuss asset protection for your firearms or creating a gun trust to own your firearms including Title II firearms, we would be happy to help you find a local Gun Trust Lawyer to create a trust for you.

One of the most common questions I get pertains to the use of regular or other so called gun trusts for the purchase of items restricted by the NFA.

The are many differences between a family, limited, or standard revocable trust and our NFA Firearms Trust. The biggest difference is that other types of revocable trusts are designed to protect your assets from the abuse of others and our trust is designed to allow for the abuse (the use) of the firearms. Our NFA firearms trust has be re-written from the ground up to protect your firearms and those who use them or are in possession of them.

In fact, you should not put non-firearms in the NFA trust and if you have a pour over will, you should change the will to direct that any firearms remaining in your estate go to your firearms trust and the remainder of the assets go to your traditional trust.

AR15sbrsilencer.jpgWith the recent discussions about the potential federal ban on assault weapons being reinstated,  I thought it would be interesting to see which states already have bans on Assault Weapons

California bans “assault weapons”, .50BMG caliber firearms, some .50 caliber ammunition and “unsafe handguns.”

Connecticut  Bans “assault weapons” as well as select fire machine guns.

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