Recently in How to Purchase a NFA Title II (Class 3) Firearm Category

May 1, 2013

NRA Annual Show Special - $199 NFA Gun Trust Form

If you are interested in a real NFA Trust or Gun Trust and looking to implement it quickly and without the additional cost of a lawyer being involved we are offering a special on the Online version of the Gun Trust for only $199.

This is anywhere from 1/2 to 1/3 of the normal price of the Gun Trust with legal support. The Online Gun Trust comes with a great manual which describes and give examples and hyperlinks to sample forms to purchase NFA firearms. It can deal with people who live in multiple states and allows you to add 3 additional authorized users. Additional authorized users can be added with an Amendment.

Many people are rushing to put their regular firearms in a Gun Trust in an attempt to protect their ability to allow children and grandchildren to use them when they are old enough and in an attempt to offer protections from pending legislation which would restrict the right to transfer firearms to future generations.

If you have a lot of firearms, you are looking for asset protection, or multi generational insulation from legislative change, you should consider the Professional Gun Trust.

To get this special price you must use the buy it now button at the bottom of the page.
You will receive a Gun Trust Code by email that will allow you to create a Gun Trust with 3 additional authorized users and purchase NFA firearms without the need for a CLEO signature, fingerprints, or a photographs.

This Gun Trust does not come with legal support. If you are looking for a Gun Trust with legal support, and local support from a lawyer licensed in your state, fill out the Contact Us Form and we will send you details on the options and pricing for your state.

If you want to take advantage of this offer, you must use the following link http://www.guntrust.com/create-trust/ to create your trust and pay for it with your credit card or PayPal account through PayPal.

January 12, 2013

Assault Weapons Ban and Gun Trusts

While there is no actual Assault Weapon Ban, we are being asked many questions about regular firearms and the benefits of a Gun Trust. As laws may change or what is proposed may be different from what actually happens, the answers below be reviewed with your local Gun Trust Lawyer® and we should all re-evaluate the situation when things become more certain.

Should I put my regular firearms in a Gun Trust?

Yes all firearms, accessories, and magazines should be put in a Gun Trust and the sooner you do it the more flexible your choices will be. A risk is that future transfers of certain guns (sounds like most guns) will be prohibited. If this happens you will not be able to transfer them to a Gun Trust. In addition, there are many other reasons why you should have your regular firearms in a Gun Trust See this article on putting Title I firearms in a NFA or Gun Trust.

How do I transfer my firearms into a NFA or Gun Trust?

While all of our Gun Trusts are designed for all firearms, many so-called Gun Trusts are not properly structured to deal with regular firearms and some not even NFA Firearms so this advice is for those who are using our Gun Trusts. The procedure and ability to transfer regular firearms will vary by state and location of the firearms. Generally it is the same procedure as how you would give or sell a gun to a friend. In most states nothing more than our assignment sheet is necessary to assign the firearms or accessories from yourself to the Gun Trust. In some states a dealer must be involved for firearm transfers and in others there are specific forms that may or may not allow for the transfer of the firearms to the trust. In general, if your state allows transfer of firearms to trusts, it should be done. If you live in one state, but the firearms are in another state, a trustee in that state may transfer the firearms into the trust.

Will the ATF know about my Title I firearms if I form a Gun Trust?

Not with our Gun Trust - Look for the GunTrustLawyer® and our Copyright notices to know if you have our Gun Trust.

Many traditional trusts and some so-called Gun Trusts or NFA Trusts use a Schedule A and/or Schedule B to list the assets or guns held by the trust. When you submit a Form 1 or Form 4 to the ATF they require a full copy of your trust along with amendments and schedules that are referenced in the documents. Our Trust does not reference a Schedule A or Schedule B and as such none is required to be submitted for approval with the ATF.

A trust which is designed for firearms should be be able to deal with all of your firearms without the risk of creating a de facto registration of your firearms. Some trusts use both a Schedule A and B in an attempt to intentionally deceive the ATF. This is not recommended as the ATF has changed their position several times on what is acceptable when submitting a trust and could start requiring any Schedules used with the trust. This could lead to a necessity to submit all of your firearms to the ATF with the next purchase.

Our Gun Trust has a different design to protect the privacy of the items that are held by the Gun Trust and only disclose the firearms that the ATF will have knowledge of anyway.

Can I Upgrade my Gun Trust to a Multi Generational Gun Trust to protect my firearms from loss upon my death?

We do allow any previous clients to upgrade their Gun Trust and not lose their initial investment in the Gun Trust. Changing your Gun Trust to a Multi Generational Gun Trust can insulate your regular firearms form future legislative changes that might have your forfeit your firearms upon your death. Many people have substantially larger firearms collections with their Title I firearms than their Tittle II firearms. For those families it may be wise to investigate upgrading your Trust to a Multi Generational Asset Protection Gun Trust. This can be done by drafting a new trust that replaces your existing trust. All you need to do is sign the new documents and simply swap your papers and you will now have all the new benefits of the most advanced gun trust available. Our Professional Gun Trust not only provides for multi generational ownership but also provides asset protection and other document for ease of management in creating and removing an unlimited number of authorized users.

December 24, 2012

An Overview of NFA Gun Trusts? What is a Gun Trust

Many of you have asked your estate-planning lawyer about Gun Trusts and have not been able to find anyone who knows about them. This is not hard to believe because other than some materials I have produced or talked to others about there is no text book on gun trusts.

We work with lawyers in every state to help them prepare gun trusts for clients in their state while providing them a resource for the knowledge and information necessary to understand the ownership, transfer and possession of firearms.

In 2006, I recognized the need to create a Trust for NFA and regular firearms. It was at that time, that I created the Gun Trust. A Gun Trust is based on the traditional concepts of estate planning. Traditional trusts deal with all types of assets that are primarily financially based, but a Gun Trust only deals with firearms. They are not meant to circumvent federal or state laws, as many would have you believe. Trusts were clearly contemplated as owners of firearms by the National Firearms Act. The National Firearms Act (NFA), requires a tax to be paid to own, possess or transfer guns such as machine guns, short barreled rifles and shotguns, silencers or sound suppressors, and AOWs. They are referred to as Title 2 firearms because they are regulated under Title 2 of the 1968 Gun Control Act. Normal firearms are regulated under Title I of the Gun Control Act. Many people mistakenly call them Class 3 weapons, but Class 3 refers to a license or Special Occupational Tax (SOT) that an FFL must obtain prior to buying or selling Title II Firearms.

History of the National Firearms Act

The NFA was passed in 1934 in response to the criminal activity of the time. It imposed a $200 tax on certain firearms thought to be contributing to the growing crime problem. In an effort to discourage the possession of these types of firearms, individuals were required to register them with the government and pay a tax of $200. Once this tax is paid, the owner will receive a Tax Stamp for the $200 that needs to be kept with the firearm. This tax stamp identifies the owner who is permitted to be in possession, and in what state the firearm can be located. Later the NFA was amended to further restrict certain items called Any Other Weapons ( an "AOW"). The tax to purchase an AOW was only $5 but to build one the tax was the same $200 as with other Title II firearms.

The NFA was designed to have strict requirements and carries stiff penalties for violations. Only an individual, business entity, or trust may own a Title II firearm in the civilian community. In addition, only the owner or their representative may be in possession of that firearm. Illegal possession, transfer, or ownership of a Title II firearm carries a prison sentence of up to 10 years, a fine of up to $250,000, loss of the firearms, and loss of the vessel (vehicle, or home) that the illegal firearms were contained. The NFA defines possession to include loaning so it is important to understand the concept of constructive possession and why individual ownership poses many risks to the average family. Many people mistakenly believe it is ok to let someone else use their Title II firearm if they are close buy, inside a closed fence, hand is on their left solder, or can see them. Even if these were permitted, imagine bringing a silencer home from a gunsmith or range. While you are on the phone your spouse grab your keys to go shopping. Surely you would not believe that this was permitted transfer or possession of a Title II firearm without pre-approval and paying the Tax. A Gun Trust can help protect and manage Title II firearms from these common issues.

ATF Requirements

Title 2 firearms must be registered with the ATF through application process. Whether you are purchasing a Firearm from a dealer with a Class 3 SOT or building your own Title II firearms, you must first go pay and obtain approval from the ATF to have it transferred or to build the firearm. For an individual the ATF requires that you fill out the appropriate form, affix a two-by-two inch photograph of yourself along with fingerprints, and have the application signed by your local chief law enforcement officer (the "CLEO") In addition you must include the tax fee which is typically $200 for each Title II firearm. Once the application is approved the person or entity who submitted the application will receive notice and the firearm may then be created or transferred. The approval time may take anywhere from three to six months.

The NFA Gun Trust

NFA gun trusts have become popular in recent years as an alternative to individual registration because of the flexibility they offer after the firearm is purchase as well as not requiring the photos, fingerprints, or CLEO signature. The Gun Trust can allow other managers or trustees of the trust to uses the firearms. State law controls the formalities of creating a trust and while in some cases lesser formalities may be required, it is recommended that you comply with the formalities other states to simplify the process and authorization in the case that you or others involved with the trust do not live in the same state where the trust was created. There are basically four types of people or entities that are involved with a Gun Trust: grantor/settlor, trustee, successor trustee and beneficiary.

The grantor or settlor is the person who creates the Gun Trust to manage who and how and when others will have access to or can use firearms within the Trust. A Trustee will submit the application to ATF but instead of registering the firearm in their name, he or she will list the Gun Trust as the owner. Trustees are also the individuals who will hold the trust property for one set of people during the grantor's life and the beneficiaries after the death of the grantor. Trustees may legally possess NFA weapons in the trust even though they are not listed on the application. In most cases a Trustee should be at least 18 years old (federal law prohibits anyone under 18 buying NFA firearms, and anyone under 21 from purchasing NFA firearms from a FFL with a Class 3 SOT) and not be otherwise prohibited from possessing firearms. A well drafted Gun Trust Lawyer® can craft provisions to allow for minor children to use the firearms with adult supervision. The beneficiary is the individual who receives the trust property upon the occurrence of a defined event that is often the death of the grantor. A well-drafted gun trust will deal with the many issues that arise in the event that one of the beneficiaries is a minor child, immature, or a prohibited person at the time the grantor dies.

Advantages of a Gun Trust

Gun Trusts should be very flexible. While most are established as a revocable trusts there are many advantages to using an irrevocable trust that are not available to a Gun Trust that is revocable. While many irrevocable trust have significant disadvantages, it is possible to intentionally violate tax code and remove the disadvantages. This type of trust is called an intentionally defective irrevocable trust.

Another advantage is that a Gun Trust does not require the Fingerprints, photographs, and CLEO approval. Not only can this speed up the process, but it also is more private.

While business entities have some of the same benefits as a Trust, they often involve yearly expenses, formalities, and are not designed to deal with ownership, transfer, possession, and use of firearms like a Gun Trust.

While many Gun Trusts are not designed to protect your firearms for generations or from creditors of yourself or your family, there is a Professional version of the Gun Trust that is designed to do both. If you are concerned about giving children and future family members that ability to use firearms if it should become illegal to transfer these firearms later or what to protect your guns from creditors, you should ask about the Multi-Generational Asset Protection Gun Trust.

Top 12 signs that you may not have a real gun trust.

1) You were told to put only NFA firearms in your trust
2) Your Trust talks about real estate, stocks, your house, and guardians of children
3) Your trust instructs others to break the law if you become incapacitated or die.
4) Your trust allows You to dissolve your trust without any prior actions
5) Co-Trustees are listed right in your trust document
6) Your Trust uses a Schedule A
7) Your Trust requires the sale of your firearms to pay you income if I become incapacitated.
8) Your trust does not specifically allow for the purchase of firearms in the powers
9) Your trust does not mention guns, the NFA, Title II, Prohibited Persons, or uses incorrect terms like Class 3 firearms.
10) Your trust did not come with an extensive manual and how to section describing almost everything you could possibly think of.
11) You were told the Gun Trust was designed to circumvent laws.
12) Your trust does not contain a Copyright by Gun Trust Lawyer® David M. Goldman

For more information on whether a NFA Gun Trust or Gun Trust makes sense for your circumstances, use the contact form on this page to receive more information on Gun Trusts.

July 14, 2012

Do I Need a Class 3 License to Buy a Silencer?

A Class 3 license is a license that a dealer obtains to sell Title II Firearms. Many individuals incorrectly confuse the terms Class 3 and Title II. We even see some lawyers making the same mistake. Class 3 SOT is a license to sell. Title II is classification of firearm that a Class 3 SOT may sell.

Title II firearms include silencers, short barrel rifles or shotguns, machine guns, AOWs and destructive devices.

So the answer is no! You do not need a Class 3 license to buy a silencer or other Title II firearm unless you are a dealer and wanting to purchase them for resale. If your documents do not use the correct terms, the people who wrote them may not understand the NFA, ATF and issues relating to the purchase, possession, transfer, and use of Title II firearms.

A real Gun Trust like one created by one of our Gun Trust Lawyers® can easily be recognized because it will be protected by our Trademarks and Copyrights.

July 6, 2012

NFA Gun Trust for all Firearms or Not?

We often get asked if one should put all of their firearms in a Gun Trust or not? Like most legal questions the answer is usually "it depends". All of our Gun Trusts are designed to hold all of your firearms and any real gun trust should be designed for all of your firearms.

With that being said we have seen many documents marketed as gun trusts or NFA gun trusts that are not really designed for NFA much less any firearm. Some which appear to be designed for firearms strictly limit the property or assets that they can hold to NFA firearms.

This is a mistake and any trust you use to hold firearms should be designed to hold all types of firearms, ammunition, and other firearms related items like scopes or optics.

If you think about it, the same decision-making process goes into the determination of whether a beneficiary ( example spouse, child, parent, friend) is appropriate for the gift of a Glock as a Machine gun or silencer.

It is not enough to vaguely mention firearms, guns or the NFA in the trust but every provision should be re-written to deal with firearms and not other types of property like a home, stock account, or car. You will not cause someone to break the law if you give them a bank account, but might do so with a gun.

Things to look for in a Gun Trust Lawyer®:

1) do they own guns and support 2A activities and rights?
2) Do they use the right terms and language? Someone who talks about Class 3 firearms or whose documents refer to them does not understand enough about the NFA to know the difference between the licences required to sell Title II firearms and the items that can be sold.
3) Are they primarily interested in selling you other legal services and using the concept of a gun trust to create a contact or sell other services?
4) Do they have support behind them?
5) Will your trust be valid if you move to another state?
6) Does you trust support authorized users in other states?
7) Can you Gun Trust be upgraded to provide multi generational and or asset protect without loss of your initial investment?
8) How much experience with Gun Trusts do they have?
9) Do they have both Criminal Law lawyers and estate planning lawyers who are familiar with the NFA and ATF?
10) Do they include unlimited support for the life of your involvement with the Gun Trust at no additional charge?
11) Do they have a comprehensive manual that covers all aspects of NFA firearms ownership, transfer, possession at no additional charge?
12) Do they write regularly on the NFA, changes with the ATF, and common issues that arise with the use, transfer, purchase, and possession of TItle II firearms?

Our network of Gun Trust Lawyers® does all of the above and you can tell if you are purchasing a Gun Trust from a lawyer we work with or whom has licensed our trusts by checking for our copyright on the trust you receive.

If you would like to know more about what a real Gun Trust Is? or What are the Benefits of a Gun Trust? Contact Us by using the form on this page, or by calling us.

We have over 200 lawyers in 43 states that we have worked with to create over 5000 Gun Trusts since we created the first trust gun trust. If you would like help contacting a Gun Trust Lawyer in your state, call or email us. Please note that the process is generally stated in our office as the federal issues are more complex than the minor state specific issues. Our support comes with both help on the state specific issues relating to trusts and firearms and the federal issues relating to the NFA and other firearms ownership transfer and possession.

June 21, 2012

Gun Trust Lawyer® Client Feedback

We often get requests for referrals and while we keep the information on our clients confidential we recently had a client send us and email which they gave us permission to publish. Andrew originally purchase a trust from a local attorney because of a recommendation based upon price and it was not until months later that he found out about gun trusts and how a gun trust is very different from a regular trust.

Often times people will ask me, "How much money should I spend on a gun for self-defense?". I usually respond by asking, "How much is your life worth?". The implication is that one would typically want a good insurance policy if they are insuring something of great value & should not cut corners in an effort to save a few bucks. I should have applied the same principle to setting up my NFA Gun Trust.

I initially went with another law firm to draft my Trust because the price was very cheap & because the lawyer represented a known SOT/Class 3 dealer. The first Trust that was drafted for me was nothing more than a standard Trust. It was 3 pages long including the cover sheet & did not mention the NFA, ATF, Form 1, Form 4, Form 5, Form 20 or even that the items to be held by the Trust should not be accessible to "prohibited persons" or minors. I e-mailed Mr. Goldman of Law Office of David M. Goldman PLLC to inquire about having a true NFA Gun Trust drafted.

I received an e-mail that explained the differences between the Trust they offer & most other standard Trusts. The main thing that convinced me I should have gone with Law Office of David M. Goldman PLLC first was the following: "Most trusts name a "Successor Trustee" but provide no guidance on how to handle NFA firearms. In fact, most trusts instruct others to violate the law and place themselves, your family, and your beneficiaries in jeopardy of criminal prosecution and confiscation of the firearms.". This is because even with a Trust, the beneficiary must submit an ATF Form 5320.20.

After speaking with Mr. Goldman via telephone to provide him with some information, I received my NFA Trust within 4 days. I received an e-mail from a local attorney which included my NFA Trust in a PDF file. I quickly used the search feature in Adobe to search for the term "NFA". I was so relieved that not only was the NFA mentioned, it was mentioned 24 times in the 19 pages of the Trust itself. After I began reading the things it covered & explained, I felt a huge relief. It is so well written that I know I do not have to worry about my beneficiaries understanding what to do in the event of my passing. I simply had to print, sign & notarize it to execute it.

I could not be happier. Law Office of David M. Goldman PLLC has been very easy to speak with about the few things I needed answers to & the included instructions cover most of the things one needs to know to stay within the confines of the law. If you are reading this, stop thinking about which law firm to use. It is of the utmost importance to have a properly drafted NFA Gun Trust for the purpose of acquiring & manufacturing NFA items. After reading how my NFA Trust deals with the complexity of NFA laws, I quickly realized how many people have done themselves a disservice by using a computer program or uneducated law firm to draft their Trust for Title II items.

I even mentioned this to the local attorney who sent my Trust to me & he had this to say: "I know what you mean. I used to sell exactly the kind of trust you are talking about. I am so happy to be able to provide a higher quality of service nowadays."

Thank you Law Office of David M. Goldman PLLC. I now know who to recommend to anyone with a serious interest in NFA firearms.

Sincerely, Andrew C.


If you are looking to create a Gun Trust and want a Gun Trust Lawyer® to help create a customized Gun Trust or Multi-Generational Asset Protection Gun Trust Contact Us.

June 5, 2012

ATF Indicted 15 Individuals for Possession and Transfer of Unregistered Firearms

Think the ATF or BATFE ignores possession and transfer of firearms, think again. Today the ATF announced that it arrested and charged 15 individuals who face between 10 and 70 years for many firearms related crimes including the unlawful manufacture of firearms and possession of an unregistered firearm.

11 of the 15 were arrested on Wednesday during a round-up. Remember that an improper transfer or possession of a NFA firearm or Title II firearm could result in severe penalties and criminal charges. These include up to 10 years in jail, a 250,000 penalty, and loss of your firearms.

Using a Professionally designed Gun Trust instead of a revocable trust or free trust that a dealer gives you can help protect you and your family from unfortunately events like this. Our Gun Trusts have been designed by Gun Trust Lawyers® to help with the ownership, possession, transfer, and use of Title II firearms.

One of the most common violations of the NFA deals with the purchase of the firearms. Many individuals do not understand the importance of having the Gun Trust make the purchase of any NFA firearms and not purchasing them individually. When permission is given for the transfer from the dealer to the trust, the purchase transaction should mirror the approval.

If you purchase a Silencer or other Title II firearms as an individual and then transfer it to a trust, there are 2 unapproved transfers: 1) the transfer from the dealer to you; and 2) the transfer from you to the trust. Neither of these has been approved and both are time bombs waiting to cause you and your family harm. Either of these makes your Title II firearm illegal and any future possession or transfer of such item even if approved by the ATF or BATFE does not make the firearm legal.

This is one of the many issues a properly drafted gun trust can help you with. We believe we have the most advanced and sophisticated gun trust on the market. We created the first true gun trust almost 5 years ago. Recently we have begun seeing more attempts to create gun trusts. Most are not more than traditional revocable trust with a few lines about firearms.

To be considered a Gun Trust, the trust should be written from the ground up to deal with firearms only firearms. A Gun Trust should be designed to deal with all of your firearms not just Title II firearms so that you get the same protections for all of your guns. If you are looking for a gun trust that will not only allow you to purchase Title II firearms with confidence but give you and your family the guidance and resources necessary to use and transfer the firearms.

If you have any questions about Gun Trusts, Contact Us to discuss your circumstances and objectives. We have a range of gun trusts designed to suit various needs.

May 16, 2012

Texas Legalizes Hunting with Silencers starting September 1 2012

With Dove season just around the corner, Texas is becoming one of the growing list of states that allows the use of silencers when hunting.

A silencer is a Title II Firearms which is restricted by the National Firearms Act and can only be sold by dealers who have a Class 3 SOT license. (They can also be purchased second-hand from individuals using the same ATF Form 4). Because of their classification they require a $200 Tax stamp and approval from the ATF or BATFE before you can take possession of them.

Other states including Texas have previously allowed the use of silencers when shooting varmint but not on game. While the law was passed in March, Texas hunters have been patiently awaiting September 1st to legally use silencers while hunting.

You will still need to apply and receive a state permit from the Texas Parks and Wildlife to hunt for alligators, game animals or game birds with a silencer.

When your ready to begin hunting with a silencer in Texas, you should contact a Texas Gun Trust Lawyer ® to discuss setting up a Gun Trust. Gun Trust when properly created can help protect you and your family from violations of the NFA and add additional flexibility that is not available for individual owners.

Gun Trust Lawyer® works with lawyers in more than 40 states including Texas to offer legally supported trusts as well as a do it yourself Gun Trusts Forms.

Note: While a Gun Trust is a type of Revocable Trust, a Traditional Trust is not appropriate for the ownership, or disposition of firearms including NFA Firearms.

May 1, 2012

A New Breed of Gun Trusts - Protecting Firearms Collectors & Their Collections

Red-Wagon-of-Guns.jpgAmmoLand has posted an article on Gun Trusts which has a good explanation of Gun Trust and why traditional estate planning is not appropriate for firearms collectors or owners. It also goes into some details on how a gun trust works, benefits of a gun trust, and how asset protection for your firearms can be accomplished. (This concept of this article was prepared by my office)

March 27, 2012

Can I Purchase a Machine Gun with a Gun Trust?

Yes, you can purchase a machine gun with a Gun Trust but you cannot purchase a new machine gun. (As long as it is purchase in a state where they are permitted) You may be wondering what the difference between and old machine gun and a new machine gun. As of May 1986 individuals, Trusts, and business entities can only purchase machine guns that were made and registered as transferable prior to May 19th of 1986.

A new M-16 can be purchased for $1200-1500, but can only be purchased by police or military, while a legally transferable pre 1986 Machine gun will cost you 10 times that amount.

So for those of you who are looking at a Gun Trust as a way to purchase an inexpensive machine gun, forget it. Not only is a machine gun expensive to buy, but its more expensive to feed. Many shoot 600-900 rounds per minute and the typical magazine will last a second or two.

November 9, 2011

Gun Trust Lawyer and Funding Your Trust

Gun Trust LawyerFunding a trust is a basic concept that is necessary for a trust to be valid. The legal concept is that the trust does not exist if there is nothing in the trust. A Gun Trust can be funded with a firearm, money, or any other asset. Typically a Gun Trust will be used to acquire firearms and is often used for Title II Firearms. When you put money in or assign money to the trust, you have funded it and it is now valid. If you never assign property to a trust, it can create problems.

For example, if your trust is unfunded, and you purchase a Title II Firearm from a dealer personally you will own it personally. An Assignment sheet may fund the trust, but if the AFT has not approved the assignment or an additional fee is not paid, you may have created a legal problem.

Funding a NFA trust, purchasing NFA Firearms, and proper use of a Gun Trust are very important to understand and something you should ask your Gun Trust Lawyer® about.

September 11, 2011

Benefits of Gun Trust over LLC in Most States

We are often asked about the advantages of a Gun Trust by one of our Gun Trust Lawyers® over a LLC. I have compile a quick list of the most common advantages.


  1. no federal or state tax or reporting requirements with a trust

  2. no annual fees with a trust

  3. with a trust you can easy, quick, and inexpensive to change who can use or have access to the firearms

  4. privacy with a trust is not available with a LLC in most states

  5. if the LLC is administratively dissolved, the items become illegal and fixing the LLC does not make them legal again under the NFA

  6. a trust deals with incapacity and death for succession planning

  7. a trust can be changed quickly (the same day) to fix problem with prohibited persons

  8. your zoning may not allow for a business to be operated at your home.

  9. easy to modify if you move or change states, LLC's often require to be registered in each state and additional yearly fees may be due.

  10. some people want to use existing business to purchase NFA firearms, this can cause your business and livelihood to be at risk if someone uses the firearms incorrectly or allows others to have possession or use them.


If you would like to discuss the creation of a NFA trust for the purchase of silencer, SBR, SBS, AOW, or a machine gun Contact Us to begin the process. We work with over 150 Gun Trust Lawyers® in more than 43 states.

June 22, 2011

Schedule A or Assignment Sheet

Recently I received a question from a client that I thought I would share. His dealer questioned the use of the Assignment Sheet because they were not familiar with it and stated that the Gun Store's lawyer said it was not necessary. ( A full detailed explanation is included in our detailed instructions and users manual) Here is a brief explanation for those who are not using our Gun Trust documents.

While the lawyer is correct, the ATF has confused the issue of funding a trust with documents which evidence the trust and mistakenly requires either a Schedule A or Assignment sheet or they reject the trust as invalid. While most trusts contain a Schedule A or a Schedule of Assets there are several issues with using a Schedule A in regards to the flexibility of our trust and privacy.

You can put a schedule of assets in the trust, but then you would have to keep it updated and if you decided to put your regular firearms in the trust, you would be creating a de facto registration of your firearms. Most gun owners do not wan't to provide the ATF a list of all of their firearms and as such we have elected to use the "Assignment Sheets". Our choice has increased privacy and allows for additional flexibility for the use of the trust without unnecessary disclosures.

As a result we have chosen to use an Assignment Sheet with our Gun Trust. If your trust uses a Schedule A and would like to discuss the benefits of using an Assignment Sheet and the other benefits of a dedicated NFA Gun Trust, Contact Us to speak with a Gun Trust Lawyer®.


April 11, 2011

New NFA Gun Trust Brochure Available

We have a new version of our NFA Brochure available to download and review. if you are interested in finding out more about NFA Trusts download the new NFA_Gun_Trust_brochure.pdf.

We would appreciate any feedback on the document.
------
If you want to create your own Gun Trust without a lawyer, there is a real online Gun Trust that can be created in less than 10 minutes.

If you want to create a gun trust with the help of a Gun Trust Lawyer® Contact Us to begin the process.

February 11, 2011

How to purchase a Title II Firearm from an out of state person.

When you are purchasing a silencer, SBR, SBS, Machine Gun, AOW, or DD from an out of state resident there are two ways of accomplishing the transfer.

The first and slower way is to do a Form 4 transfer to a local Class 3 SOT dealer. Once this is approved a tax free transfer can be made from that dealer to one in the purchaser's state and then a second Form 4 transfer can be done from the buyer's dealer to the buyer. This will involved 2 transfer fees and generally each dealer will charge a fee for the paperwork and transfer.

The second method involves transferring it directly on a Form 4 to the buyers Class 3 dealer who is located in the same state as the buyer. Once this is approved a second Form 4 transfer can take place from the dealer to the buyer. This will involve 2 transfer fees and fees from the single dealer. This method should be quicker since the dealer to dealer transfer is eliminated.