Recently in Title II Weapons Category

January 13, 2011

Purchase of Previously Manufactured NFA Firearm under a Form 1

sbr-silencer.jpgIf you are purchasing a Firearm that was previously manufactured under a Form 1 it may contain the engraving of the previous owner. Since this item was previously manufactured, you will be using an ATF Form 4 and not an ATF Form 1 to transfer this item and as such it will require no engraving on your part.

December 14, 2010

Thinking of a New SBR? Check out the AAC 300 BLACKOUT

Check out the new 300 AAC Blackout from Advanced Armament Corp.

Introducing the Advanced Armament Corp. 300 AAC BLACKOUT (300BLK). This system was developed to launch 30 caliber projectiles from the AR platform without a reduction in magazine capacity and compatible with the standard bolt.

Full power 123 grain ammunition matches the ballistics of the 7.62x39mm AK, has 37% more energy than 5.56mm M855, and 9% more than 6.8 SPC TAP 110. In fact, from a 9 inch barrel, the 300BLK has more muzzle energy than 5.56mm M855 from a 16 inch barrel. When 300 BLK is used in a 16 inch barrel, it has 23% more energy than 5.56mm M855 from a 16 inch barrel - with much higher-mass projectiles for a more dramatic effect on the target. Or choose subsonic cartridges for optimal use with a sound suppressor - 220 grain Sierra OTM (open-tip match) bullets vastly outperforms a 9mm MP5-SD in penetration and long range accuracy.

Due to the high efficiency of the cartridge, less powder is used than 5.56mm, which results in a rifle that is a comfortable to shoot - even with a short barrel.

Reloading dies available from Forster products, Reamers and headspace guages available from Pacific Tool and Gauge.

November 14, 2010

Brandishing a Silencer?

How many of you have taken your silencer out to show to someone. Did you know that even if it is not attached to a gun, a silencer is defined by federal law as a firearm. Many states also define it as a dangerous weapon like a taser or a knife.

In Florida and many states that have concealed weapons permits, it is illegal to show someone a firearm or weapon under certain circumstances. With this in mind, you should be careful to comply with your states concealed weapons laws when showing people your silencer. Many people do not realize they are legal and because of this it is possible that you could be reported for having one and charged with a crime.

While we know of know one who has actually been charged with this offense and feel that the likelihood is small, it does not make the act legal and you should be cautious.

July 23, 2010

Gun Store Provides Invalid Trust Form; ATF Initially Approves 3 Transfers

A Washington state gun store prepared an invalid trust for their customer and the ATF approved three Form 4 transfers.

Not only is the preparation of a trust by a non-lawyer the unauthorized practice of law, but it also could put you at risk of an invalid transfer, possession, and use charge by the ATF which could subject you to forfeiture of your firearms, a $250,000 penalty, and up to 10 years in jail.

This particular gun store trust did not have a trustee, a successor trustee or a beneficiary and was missing required schedules that were required for validity by the way the trust was drafted.

Remember that even if the ATF approves an invalid trust, it does not make the transfer legal. ATF is approving a transfer to a non-existent entity, which you cannot comply with, and when you take possession it becomes illegal. The good news is many trusts can be updated to be valid and keep the original name so that there is a valid trust behind the possession of the firearms. If you would like to have your trust reviewed, contact a Gun Trust Lawyer®.

July 6, 2010

Class III Dealers

We are often asked for a list of Class III dealers. There is a website that lists Class III dealers in many states. GunTrustLawyer.com is a sponsor of the site as we have found it to be a useful site to our clients.

June 5, 2010

Listen to GunTalk Sunday at 3 PM EST Call 1-866-825-5486 (June 6th)

Want to ask a question about Title II firearms or the NFA and NFA trusts, I will be the guest of Tom Gresham on Gun Talk tomorrow (June 6th) at 3 PM EST. Call 1-866-825-5486 to ask questions or just email us. If you do not get Gun Talk in your area, you can listen to one of the many live streams or download it on iTunes

You can also listen to a Gun Talk Sunday's from 7-10PM on the re broadcast on Sirius Channel 108 and XM Channel 139

June 2, 2010

How long does a Form 1 or Form 4 Take to be Approved by the ATF

While times have varied greatly over the last few years, it appears that the time your ATF Form 4 or Form 1 will take for approval seems to be tied to who the examiner is. A website NFATRACKER.com is collecting information on the times and offers some reporting on how long various transfers are taking. While the site is gaining speed and beginning to gather data, anyone who has a recent transfer should go and record your results. It is easy to create a login and select the type of item and whether you were an individual trust or corporation and the dates that certain events took place. So far we do not know how or if there is a way to pick who your examiner is by what the name of your trust is. The site's manager has stated that one reader seems to have found that there is some correlation between the name of the dealer and the examiner but it is still unknown if you can do anything to improve the time you trust takes for approval. If we figure anything out we will keep you updated. If you need help finding a local NFA Gun Trust attorney, have questions about a trust, or want to create a Valid NFA trust Contact Us.

March 18, 2010

BATFE Engraving Requirements for Short-Barreled Rifle or Shotgun (SBS/SBR)

Publication

ATF 5300.4 in 27 CFR 479.102 (page 92) describes what is necessary to engrave on a SBR or SBS when one is manufacturing. This is not necessary if you purchase one that is already manufactured as it will have been done for you.
1) On the Frame or Receiver the Serial number;
2) on the frame, receiver, or barrel the following additional information;
   A)The model;
   B)The caliber or gage;
   C)Your name or name of the Trust in the case of a Trust (no abbreviations are permitted for the Trust name);
   D)The city and state (you can abbreviate the state with the official 2 digit state code)

The above mentioned information must be engraved, casted, stamped (impressing) or otherwise conspicuously placed or caused to be engraved, cast, stamped (impressed) or placed to a minimum depth of .003 inch and in a print size of the Serial number shall be no smaller than 1/16 inch.

February 16, 2010

ATF says ATI's Fake Suppressor is Regulated by NFA

If you purchased a GSG 5 SD model with a barrel shroud (Fake Suppressor) ATF has now determined that this is regulated by the NFA and must be replaced.
To all retail customers:

On January 2010 American Tactical Imports Inc received official notification from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and explosives that the original barrel shroud (aka: fake suppressor) supplied with your GSG 5 SD model must be replaced. It has been determined that this shroud is regulated under the National Firearms Act. American Tactical will provide a replacement shroud at no charge for each GSG 5 SD model sold or currently in inventory.

Consumers in possession of a GSG 5 SD model with the original shroud in place on the firearm are now in violation of the NFA. To avoid continued violation of the NFA, ATI asks that all persons in possession obtain a replacement shroud as soon as possible. We anticipate arrival of the new shrouds to begin by the middle of February 2010.

IMPORTANT: THE ORIGINAL SD MODEL SHROUD MUST BE RETURNED ACCOMPANIED BY THE FIREARM SERIAL NUMBER BEFORE A REPLACEMENT SHROUD IS ISSUED. THE DIAMETER OF THE SD SHROUD IS 1-9/16". DO NOT RETURN THE SMALLER CARBINE SHROUD.

WHAT TO DO:
If possible return your old shroud to the dealer where purchased and show him this notice. The shroud will be returned to ATI along with a list of serial numbers from the guns that the shrouds were removed. ATI will send replacements to the dealer for pick up at your convenience; ATI will be sending replacements as fast as logistics allow. If your dealer is out of business or difficult to reach, or you purchased your gun used, from a consumer, return the shroud directly by US mail or UPS to American Tactical Imports Inc. 100 Airpark Drive Rochester, NY 14624.

PLEASE TRY NOT TO CALL US. We will provide comprehensive information on our web site www.americantactical.us or by e-mail to atiexchange@americantactical.us

REMEMBER, INCLUDE THE FIREARM SERIAL NUMBER WITH EACH SHROUD OR A REPLACEMENT WILL NOT BE ISSUED.

This action IS NOT being instituted through any fault and is strictly due to NFA compliance. American Tactical will assume the responsibility to satisfy the requirements in an effort to minimize the impact on our customers and protect your investment.
We at American Tactical Imports Inc. sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused by this unfortunate situation.

Sincerely,
Anthony DiChario
President C.E.O.

February 4, 2010

ATF Reviewing Trusts for Legal Validity

The ATF has recently made a decision to review Trusts for legal sufficiency. While this may slow things down for those using generic trust for NFA purchases (Quicken, Legal Zoom, Gun Store Trusts) I think its a good idea and will protect many from unknowingly violating the NFA.

We have seen several issues where the ATF is declaring trusts to be invalid that are in fact valid under various state laws. They claim they are not practicing law in those states and will not give legal advise. They suggest that you have the trust reviewed by a lawyer to tell you why it is invalid or make changes to the trust to make it valid.

If your trust was rejected by ATF we can help by reviewing and or amending the trust with our network of 75 attorneys in more than 40 states.

August 5, 2009

Constructive Possession: NFA Trusts vs Individual Ownership

777968_alcatraz.jpgThe NFA defines who can own a Title II firearm as a natural person, corporation or trust.... When an individual makes application to own a Title II firearm they are the only person who can be in possession or have access to the firearm. This creates a problem for many individuals who are married, have others who know the combination or how to gain access to the items, or want to allow others to use the firearms, even in their presence.

Joshua Prince has written and excellent analysis of the case law surrounding constructive possession and the US v. Turnbough case which stated that the Government may establish constructive possession by demonstrating that the defendant exercised ownership, dominion or control over the premises in which the contraband is concealed. Joshua goes on the state that if a spouse or other person does have the combination to the safe where the NFA firearms are kept it would be virtually impossible for the prosecutor to show that the other individual knowingly has the power to exercise dominion and control over the firearms.

The real problem occurs when another does have access to the items or can exercise dominion and control over the NFA firearm because the prosecutor can then charge that individual with constructive possession. In US v. Turnbough, an illegal firearm was in Turnbough's home and the court of appeals found that a reasonable jury could have found that he, his live in girlfriend, and her child could conclude that all three parties exercised dominion and control over the gun and the possession could be either sole or joint.

While there are not any constructive possession cases involving NFA firearms this does not mean that the BATFE could not bring a charge of constructive possession against a spouse or other person who could exercise dominion and control over an NFA firearm.

Remember that there is no intent element to violate the NFA. Like speeding, you do not have to intend to speed to be charged with speeding.

So how can you protect yourself, your family, and your friends? If you use a NFA trust or other allowable business entity to own the items, you can allow others to be in possession, use, purchase, and know how to access the firearms.

There are many downsides to using a business entity to own NFA firearms. In most states, there are yearly state fees associated with the entity. In addition, you must deal with loss of privacy, EIN's, and federal tax compliance for the entity. The ATF only recognizes those on the official state records as having access to the items. The entity will be subject to probate upon the death of any owner. There are typically costs associated with updating the state records to allow for changes in possession and it takes time to make these changes. There are no provisions in a business entity to deal with incapacity or death in determining whom the beneficiaries are, where they live, if they are qualified to receive the items, directions on how to properly transfer the ownership and items, and most importantly if the beneficiary is mature and responsible enough upon your death that you would want to put the firearms in their hands.

Because a trust deals with these items on a regular basis, a NFA Trust (different than the traditional Quicken, Legal Zoom, or lawyer prepared revocable trust) can provide the ability to easily add, remove, or modify the users, owners, and purchasers as well as deal with the unique issues of firearms ownership that are not present in other types of ownership.

We work with more than 75 lawyers in over 43 states that can help you design a NFA trust to meet your specific needs and goals. Our NFA trust does not use a schedule of assets so your other firearms that are placed in the trust do not become know to the ATF upon the purchase of a Title II firearm from a Class 3 dealer or individual.

If you have any question on how a NFA trust can help you purchase Title II firearms and protect your family and friends from the criminal penalties associated with improper possession, purchase, use, or transfers please contact a Gun Trust Lawyer® and we would be happy to answer your questions. In Florida please contact our Florida Gun Trust Lawyer®.

March 17, 2009

How to Explain a Gun Trust to Family or Friends who are not Pro Firearms Rights

Father-swinging-baby.jpgRecently my wife was in New York visiting some family when they attempted to convince her that I, her husband, was helping criminals avoid background checks and arming them with machine guns, assault weapons, and other "illegal" firearms.  Additionally, the opined that my NFA Gun Trust Lawyer® website was a radical Gun Rights forum. 

While I would not find this hard to believe coming from people who live in the Northeast, I did find it hard to believe from transplanted New Yorkers who live in Texas and been surrounded by individual gun owners and guns being a part of the culture.  In trying to explain what I do to some family members including my wife, I found that there were some basic misunderstandings of the process, and the state of the interpretation of the 2nd Amendment of the Constitution as the Supreme Court interpreted it last year.  I decided that this would be valuable for many of my clients who are often dealing with similar issues.  Many people have family members or friends who are uneducated on the current status and interpretation of the Second Amendment.  As a result many people feel that there is an interpretation issue surrounding what the Second Amendment means.  While the Supreme court in a divided court found in favor of the individuals right to own a firearm, they unanimously found that the Second Amendment applied to an individuals right to keep and bear arms and not to that of a state.   We are at a time in history, when many of our rights involved in gun ownership are at risk.  Even though our current administration states that they support the Second Amendment, the do not support it as it has recently been interpreted and have an agenda posted on their website under urban plans to ban assault weapons.  They are currently trying to define an assault weapon as any firearm that have a removable cartridge.

statue_of_liberty.jpgWhile some people are not "pro-firearms," they still may believe in the ability for others to exercise their 2nd amendment right if they so choose.  This is similar to people that are "pro-choice" on abortion issues, but do not impose their beliefs on others. In the United States, women have the right to choose (within limitations) and Americans have the right to own firearms (within limitations), without unnecessary burdens or restrictions from the State government.  Whether or not you choose to possess the firearm is a decision that should be up to you just as other individual rights that are guaranteed to us in the US constitution.  

A person cannot purchase a machine gun without a background check just by using my trust.  The Gun or Firearms Trust merely prevents the local CLEO (Chief Law Enforcement Officer) from arbitrarily denying fully qualified individuals the ability to exercise their constitutional right to purchase a firearm.  A NFA or Gun trust does not make it easier for a criminal to purchase a firearm because criminals do not purchase legal machine guns, silencers, and SBR's because of the ease in which these items can be tracked back to the purchaser.

A person that intends to commit a crime with an firearm does not pay $20,000 - $250,000 for a legal machine gun and notify ATF of this purchase.  If a person wants to commit a crime with a machine gun, he or she is more likely to purchase it illegally on the street, without paperwork, and for a fraction of the price (around $1200).


funeral.jpg

Besides allowing individuals to protect their right to purchase firearms, my trust provides protections for the families and friends of gun owners that are not available with individual ownership.  Through the traditional purchase route, many individuals would be at risk of criminal activity and prosecution for permitting a friend, spouse, parent, or child use or have access to the items.  In addition, individual ownership does not deal with important issues, such as incapacity or death of the firearm owner.  Likewise, a gun trust addresses the transfer of these firearms to heirs that may not be eligible to receive them, such as children or people living in a state where Title II firearms are not permitted.  As a Gun Trust Lawyer®, I have seen many individuals that were forming corporations, trusts, and LLCs that were generic in nature and did not address their needs.  Due to these errors, they placed their families, friends, and children at unnecessary risk.  A risk that can be avoided with a adequate NFA gun trust.

In 1934, the government enacted the National Firearms Act as an effort to stop the gangster activity.  In particular, the government used its taxing arm to arrest them for being in possession of improperly registered or transferred weapons.  Since then, there has only been one illegal use of a legal machine gun for criminal activity, which was committed by a police officer.

I believe that Americans should be proud to exercise their rights to own firearms and help others understand the flaws in their logic.  Remember Guns don't kill people, criminals kill people.  If you look at most firearm legislation, it only seeks to restrict lawful ownership of firearms.  It does not offer an answer to the question, "how to keep guns out of the hands of criminals," which should be the focus of any gun control.

December 27, 2008

Thompson Machine Gun Wanted

I have a client who is looking to purchase a Thompson Machine Gun in Florida.  If you are not in Florida, there is a local transfer agent willing to help out.  If you have one for sale or know of one at a good price please let us know.
December 10, 2008

NFA Gun Trust Training

On Thursday December 11th, 2008 the Law Office of David M. Goldman PLLC will be providing training to the management and sales people at Shooters in Jacksonville Florida on the benefits and advantages of using an NFA Trust to purchase and hold Title II weapons under the NFA.  If you have a Gun Store and sell Title II firearms please contact a  Gun Trust Lawyer® to schedule training for your staff.
October 7, 2008

New Jersey (NJ): What NFA Firearms can I own? Updated

New Jersey NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In New Jersey you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Machine Guns *
Any Other Weapon (AOW)
In New Jersey you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.
Silencers
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)
Destructive Devices (DD)

Follow this link to find out more about New Jersey and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms

* Machine guns - Onwership for persons is regulated under N.J.S. 2C:58-5
NOTE: In New Jersey, AOW's are limited