Recently in Michigan - Gun Trust Lawyer Category

March 28, 2014

Michigan (MI) What NFA Firearms can I own? Updated 3/28/14

Michigan NFA Class 3 firearms

There are several type of Title II firearms which are sold by Class 3 SOT dealers that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of Title II firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the National Firearms Act.

In Michigan you can own the following Title II Firearms that are regulated the the National Firearms Act:

Machine Guns
Suppressors
Any Other Weapon (AOW) (only some)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)  (See Below but Legal as of 3/28/14)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)  (See Below but Legal as of 3/28/14)
In Michigan you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.
 some AOW's like Tasers or Stun Guns by private citizens whether or not they are class 3 items or the individual has a CCW permit
The Michigan State Police put together a legal update on SBR and SBS which describes the differences between those over 26 inches and those under 26 inches.

Continue reading "Michigan (MI) What NFA Firearms can I own? Updated 3/28/14" »

November 15, 2013

Michigan Senate panel approves bill to lift ban on short-barreled shotguns and rifles

The Michigan Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday unanimously approved legislation that would lift the state's ban on short-barreled shotguns and rifles.

Senate Bill 610 would align Michigan with more than 40 other states that allow residents to own such guns if they meet federal requirements.

The current Michigan regulations prohibit people from manufacturing, selling, offering for sale or possessing a short-barreled shotgun or rifle. There is an exception allowing ownership of an antique gun unlikely to be used as a weapon. Often if the gun is modified it no longer remains the C&R status of an antique gun.

We will keep you updated on what happens and if or when residents of Michigan are able to purchase a SBR or SBS.

July 1, 2013

Transferring firearms to a Gun Trust without Criminal Sanctions

As more lawyers begin to dabble with Gun Trusts we are seeing many who do not understand firearms and their unique nature which can often involve criminal penalties related to the improper transfer, possession, and use related to firearms or ammunition.

While it is fine to transfer a pair or sox, coins, most personal property to your trust without doing anything other than assigning it, the transfer of restricted items like firearms or ammunition is a different matter. If you can sell a gun to an individual in your state without going through a dealer you should be able to transfer a firearm to your trust without going through dealer. This is the case in most states.

In a few states like California, Colorado, Connecticut, DC, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania where all personal transfers of some or all firearms must go through a background check, there may be no exception for transferring a firearm to a trust even if it is your own trust. Sure an argument could be made that there is no transfer and as such you should not have to go through a dealer, but why would one take the risk.

Several lawyers in California have recently been having discussions over such a topic. They even suggest that a transfer to a joint trust could be problematic because there are multiple owners. While a Gun Trust with multiple owners can be problematic, it is not for this reason.

In order to be valid, a Gun Trust must be funded, which involves transferring some property into the trust. The discussion between several California lawyers introduces an interesting question: Would it violate the California statute if you owned a firearm separately from you spouse, and then tried to transfer the firearm into a trust that named your spouse as a co-trustee or co-settlor?

While several of the lawyers point out, certain transfers are exempt under the statute. The exempt transfers in California include transfers between members of the same immediate family, including spouses. The transfer of a grantor's property to himself, as trustee of his own trust, is not considered a transfer. So, a couple that jointly owns a firearm, and transfers that firearm into a trust that names both parties as co-settlors, would not really be a "transfer." This is really just a declaration of trust.

On the other hand, as the discussion continues, a firearm owned separately by one spouse would have to be transmuted to community property before it could be transferred to a trust with co-settlors in order to comply with the statute.

While California may have such exemptions involving trusts it is not clear how they apply to firearms or if the legislative intent of the laws may change the interpretation of transfers to a trust when dealing with the transfer of firearms. This is why in jurisdictions where private transfers are required to go through a dealer, we always recommend doing so in order to comply with governing statutes. It is better to be safe than sorry.

One exception might be where someone owned a pre ban firearm as an individual and wants to put the pre ban firearm in their trust to maintain ownership and possession where it would not otherwise be permitted. This situation might justify the expense necessary for a proper determination on the subject. For most people, the relatively minor cost of using a dealer to transfer a firearm makes the decision easy.

Additionally experienced Gun Trust Lawyers® know that firearms rights are very important to our clients. They do not want others who may be involved with the trust to be able to take away the firearms or their ability to use them. It is for this reason that we draft our trusts with special powers for the Settlor. It is foreseeable that a multi-settlor trust could create a conflict of interest amongst your clients.

While we have stated many times that any valid trust can purchase or own firearms, it is issues like these that make it clear that a regular trust should not be used to purchase Title I or Title II firearms. If you are married, or live in a state that have many restrictions on firearms, legal support by a local Gun Trust Lawyer® is important. You will also find that the experience of the lawyer in dealing with Gun Trusts is important.

We have been drafting Gun Trusts for 6 years and have drafted over 5000 Gun Trusts across the United States. If you would like more information on a Gun Trust in your state, just fill out the contact us form on this website and we will send a free report on Gun Trusts.

June 1, 2012

Michigan (MI) What NFA Firearms can I own? Updated

Michigan NFA Class 3 firearmsThere are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

Michigan has several laws dealing with the registration, ownership, and possession of firearms that are changing in January 2009.   In Michigan you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act:

Machine Guns
Silencers (as of late 2011)
Any Other Weapon (AOW)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS) *
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR) *

In Michigan you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.

Some AOW's like Tasers or Stun Guns by private citizens whether or not they are Title II ( Sold by a class 3 dealer) or the individual has a CCW permit. *SBR & SBS are restricted by the Michigan Compiled laws 750.224b(3) which limits these items to C&R, Collectors items not likely to be used as a weapon but only if the person selling, offering, or possessing the firearm also complies with the Michigan Compiled laws 28.422 (will be amended Jan 2009) and 28.429 ( will be repealed Jan 2009).

Follow this link to find out more about Michigan and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms

Silencers status updated 2012

September 2, 2011

Silencers Now Legal in Michigan

Today, Attorney General of the State of Michigan, Bill Schuette wrote an opinion on the legality of Silencers in Michigan under MCL 750.224(1)(b) and other state laws in which he states:

The possession, manufacture, or sale of a firearm silencer is permitted in Michigan under MCL 750.224(1)(b) if the person is licensed or approved to possess, manufacture, or sell such a device by the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, as required by MCL 750.224(3)(c). Possession, manufacture, or sale of a firearm silencer by an unlicensed or unapproved person is a felony, punishable by up to five years imprisonment under MCL 750.224(2).

If you want to make or purchase a silencer in Michigan you should read the
Michigan Attorney Generals' Option 7260

Because of the many requests we have found a dealer in MI who will be stocking silencers. If you find others please let us know.

Continue reading for growing list of dealers.

Continue reading "Silencers Now Legal in Michigan" »

December 6, 2010

Michigan Petition Regarding NFA Firearms and Restrictions

I received an email from Daren Lott who let me know about a Petition in Michigan to clarify the laws regarding NFA firearms and have the AG address issues that were not addressed in his previous opinion. Follow this link to find out more about the petition or to see the details read the rest of the article.

Note
We do have lawyers in Michigan we are working with to form Michigan Gun Trusts and have not experienced any problems with them.

Continue reading "Michigan Petition Regarding NFA Firearms and Restrictions" »

February 9, 2009

Where are Assault Weapons Banned Today

AR15sbrsilencer.jpgWith the recent discussions about the potential federal ban on assault weapons being reinstated,  I thought it would be interesting to see which states already have bans on Assault Weapons

California bans "assault weapons", .50BMG caliber firearms, some .50 caliber ammunition and "unsafe handguns."

Connecticut  Bans "assault weapons" as well as select fire machine guns.

District of Columbia prohibits new acquisition of handguns and any semi-automatic firearm capable of using a detachable ammunition magazine of more than 12 rounds capacity and any handgun not registered after February 5, 1977  (parts recently ruled unconstitutional).

Hawaii prohibits "assault pistols."  Assault rifles and shotguns are restricted the same regular rifles and shotguns

Illinois: Chicago, Evanston, Oak Park, Morton Grove, Winnetka, Wilmette, and Highland Park prohibit handguns; some cities prohibit other kinds of firearms.  Firearms identification card is required.

Maryland prohibits "assault pistols"; the sale or manufacture of any handgun manufactured after Jan. 1, 1985, that does not appear on the Handgun Roster; and the sale of any handgun manufactured after January 1, 2003 that is not equipped with an "integrated mechanical safety device."

Massachusetts: It is unlawful to sell, transfer or possess "any assault weapon or large capacity feeding device" [more than 10 rounds] that was not legally possessed on September 13, 1994 and the sale of handguns not on the Firearms Roster. The City of Boston has a separate "assault weapons" law.

Michigan: Certain folding stock carbines are restricted.

New Jersey  bans "assault weapons" and high capacity magazines.

New York  bans "assault weapons" unless lawfully possessed or manufactured prior to September 13, 1994.

Ohio: Some local jurisdictions use to ban "assault weapons.", but because of a Ohio Supreme court case, all of these laws are unconstitutional under the preemption doctrine recognized by Ohio.

Virginia prohibits "Street Sweeper" shotguns.

The sunset of the federal assault weapons ban does not affect the validity of state and local "assault weapons" bans.

  NOTE  the picture above is an Assault weapon that is also a SBR and has a silencer.

December 31, 2008

Michigan NFA Trust Lawyers in Waterford, Farmington Hills, and Grand Haven

We have NFA Gun Trust Lawyer®s in several locations in Michigan to help purchase Title II firearms or those restricted under the National Firearms Act.  To purchase these items you need a Class 3 license or permit to take possession of the  SBR, SBS, or Machine Gun.

Note there are some additional restrictions on the possession of the NFA firearms over and above the Federal Restrictions found in the ATF. 

The general process for creating an Michigan NFA Trust is to Contact Us so that we can discuss your desires and merge that with what you need.  Once the trust is drafted and reviewed by a Michigan Gun Trust Lawyer®, the trust can be reviewed.  Generally within 7 days of contacting us or calling us you can be ready to purchase the items.

Note even if you do not live in Waterford, Farmington Hills, or Grand Have the lawyers can send the documents by email and have the discussion with you over the telephone.
December 31, 2008

Michigan State Gun Laws

MICHIGAN STATE GUN LAWS.pdf is a summary of the Michigan state gun laws.  Please download it to view detailed gun laws that may apply to NFA or Title II firearms