May 2008 Archives: NFA Gun Trust Lawyer Blog  

May 2008 Archives

May 30, 2008

Pennsylvania's UFA: Definitions

Pennsylvania's UFA: Definitions

    18 PA.C.S. § 6102 deals with defining terms used in the PA Uniform Firearms Act of 1995 (PA UFA). It should be noted that this section is not all inclusive and that particular provisions may have their own definitions.
    "The following words and phrases, when used in this sub-chapter shall have, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise, the meanings given to them in this section:" (18 PA.C.S. § 6102).
1.    "COMMISSIONER." The Commissioner of the Pennsylvania State Police.
2.    "COMMONWEALTH PHOTO IMAGING NETWORK." The computer network administered by the Commonwealth and used to record and store digital photographs of an individual's face and any scars, marks, tattoos or other unique features of the individual.
3.    "CONVICTION." A conviction, a finding of guilty or the entering of a plea of guilty or nolo contendere, whether or not judgment of sentence has been imposed, as determined by the law of the jurisdiction in which the prosecution was held. The term does not include a conviction which has been expunged or overturned or for which an individual has been pardoned unless the pardon expressly provides that the individual may not possess or transport firearms.
4.    "COUNTY TREASURER." The county treasurer or, in home rule or optional plan counties, the person whose duties encompass those of a county treasurer.
5.    "CRIME PUNISHABLE BY IMPRISONMENT EXCEEDING ONE YEAR."
        a. The term does not include any of the following:
1.    Federal or State offenses pertaining to antitrust, unfair trade practices, restraint on trade or regulation of business.
2.    State offenses classified as misdemeanors and punishable by a term of imprisonment not to exceed two years"
6.    "FIREARM." Any pistol or revolver with a barrel length less than 15 inches, any shotgun with a barrel length less than 18 inches or any rifle with a barrel length less than 16 inches, or any pistol, revolver, rifle or shotgun with an overall length of less than 26 inches. The barrel length of a firearm shall be determined by measuring from the muzzle of the barrel to the face of the closed action, bolt or cylinder, whichever is applicable.
7.    "FUND." The Firearm Ownership Fund established in section 6111.3 (relating to Firearm Ownership Fund).
8.    "LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER." Any person employed by any police department or organization of the Commonwealth or political subdivision thereof who is empowered to effect an arrest with or without warrant and who is authorized to carry a firearm in the performance of that person's duties.
9.    "LOADED." A firearm is loaded if the firing chamber, the nondetachable magazine or in the case of a revolver, any of the chambers of the cylinder contain ammunition capable of being fired. In the case of a firearm which utilizes a detachable magazine, the term shall mean a magazine suitable for use in said firearm which magazine contains such ammunition and has been inserted in the firearm or is in the same container or, where the container has multiple compartments, the same compartment thereof as the firearm.
10.    "PENNSYLVANIA SHERIFFS' ASSOCIATION." The State association of sheriffs authorized by the act of June 14, 1923 (P.L. 774, No. 305), entitled "An act authorizing the sheriffs of the several counties of this Commonwealth to organize themselves into a State Association, for the purpose of holding annual meetings, to secure more uniformity and cooperation in the conduct of their offices, and providing for the payment of certain expenses in connection with such meetings by the various counties."
11.    "SAFEKEEPING PERMIT." As defined in 23 PA.C.S. § 6102 (relating to definitions).
12.    "SHERIFF."
    a. Except as provided in paragraph (b), the sheriff of the county.
    b. In a city of the first class, the chief or head of the police department.
13.    "STATE." When used in reference to different parts of the United States, includes the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and territories and possessions of the United States.

May 30, 2008

Transportation of Firearms in Pennsylvania

Depending on the type of firearm, either long gun or handgun, the laws regarding transportation differ. (18 PA.C.S. § 6106).

A long gun includes rifles, shotguns, and may include NFA firearms, depending on whether the barrel and overall length classifies it as a long rifle or handgun. All long guns must be unloaded, prior to transport; meaning that the chamber must be clear and all magazines removed.  Ammunition must be stored in a separate container and cannot be loaded in the magazines.

A handgun must also be unloaded, prior to transport, unless the individual possesses a valid PA License to Carry Firearms (LTCF) or other similar license issued by another state, which PA honors. For more information see the article on Pennsylvania Concealed Gun Reciprocity.  Moreover, handguns may only be transported to and from specific activities and locations. Some examples of "to and From" are the place of purchase, repair, range, hunting location, or other places listed in 18 PA.C.S. § 6106. 

If Class 3 firearms are going to be transported out of state, one needs to file a Form 20 to obtain permission from the AFT.

May 29, 2008

Concealed Carry in Pennsylvania Updated

To carry a handgun concealed in public, an individual must possess a valid Pennsylvania License to Carry Firearms (LTCF, 18 PA.C.S. § 6106) or an equivalent license issued by a state that Pennsylvania honors (See www.attorneygeneral.gov for up to date reciprocity agreements).

An individual may carry a concealed handgun, without a LTCF:
  1. in one's home,
  2. fixed place of business, and
  3. on private property where permission has been given
(18 PA.C.S. § 6106).

Moreover, an individual cannot carry a handgun in a vehicle without a valid Pennsylvania LTCF or an equivalent license issued by a state that Pennsylvania honors (18 PA.C.S. § 6106). Nevertheless, an individual with a LTCF is NOT required to carry concealed; he/she may carry openly, including in cities of the first class, such as Philadelphia.

Under the Pennsylvania Uniform Firearms Act (UFA), Pennsylvania resident LTCF are issued by the county sheriff of the jurisdiction in which the applicant resides. Nonresidents licenses are issued by select county sheriff offices.

Pennsylvania is a "shall issue" state, meaning that the appropriate sheriff must issue the license, unless the applicant is prohibited.
    There are places which are off-limits in Pennsylvania , when concealed carrying.  These include:
1. All Federal Facilities (Unless Authorized);
2. All Court Facilities;
3. State Parks (except while in a vehicle);
4. Adult and Juvenile Detention Facilities; and 5. Airport Terminals (secure areas only).

The issue of both open and concealed carry on school property has not been determined. Per 18 PA.C.S. 912, possession of "a weapon in the buildings of, on the grounds of, or in any conveyance providing transportation to or from any elementary or secondary publicly-funded educational institution, any elementary or secondary private school licensed by the Department of Education or any elementary or secondary parochial school" is a misdemeanor of the first degree. However, the statute allows for "a defense that the weapon is possessed and used in conjunction with a lawful supervised school activity or course or is possessed for other lawful purpose."

There is an issue of the Pennsylvania State Police (PSP newsletter regarding CCW on/in schools zones.  It gives an example of a PA concealed license permit as being an exception to the federal law; however, there is no definitive answer at this time.  You might read page 3 of the PSP newsletter regarding CCW on/in a school zone.PA firearms2006_Dec.pdf

It should be noted that Pennsylvania allows the concealed (with a LTCF) or open carry of a firearm in an establishment that sells or serves alcohol.

    Anyone considering open or concealed carry should check out the PAOpenCarry.org website and brochure

May 29, 2008

Pennsylvania Concealed Gun Reciprocity

Pennsylvania's Attorney General, Tom Corbett, has been instrumental in enacting new reciprocity agreements between Pennsylvania and other states. For the most up to date information, an individual should check the Attorney General's website. On the Pennsylvania Attorney General's site, an individual can download copies of each reciprocity agreement. Follow the following links for a map of US reciprocity agreements, a Map of Pennsylvania Reciprocity agreements.

Currently, an individual with a Pennsylvania LTCF may conceal carry in Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, and Wyoming.

If you are a Pennsylvania resident the following states will also honor your LTCT Colorado, Florida, Michigan, New Hampshire, West Virginia Open Carry may or may not be legal in the above states.
May 28, 2008

Pennsylvania Gun Trust Lawyer®s

We have associations with lawyers and attorneys in Pennsylvania.  These Pennsylvania Gun Trust Lawyer®s can provide NFA gun Trusts for the entire state of Pennsylvania.  A NFA Gun Trust can help protect individuals and their families from the criminal and civil penalties associated with the improper transfer or possession of a class 3 firearm regulated under the National Firearms Act.  In addition, the process of purchasing a silencer, SBR, or machine gun can be significantly reduced in the amount of time required and paperwork that is required.

They have offices in
  • Allentown Pennsylvania;
  • Bechtelsville Pennsylvania;
  • Camp Hill Pennsylvania;
  • Exton Pennsylvania;
  • Pottstown Pennsylvania;
  • Lancaster Pennsylvania;
  • Lebanon Pennsylvania;
  • North Wales Pennsylvania;
  • Pottstown Pennsylvania; and
  • Reading Pennsylvania
If you are located in another area of Pennsylvania they can also provide services by email and telephone in much the same way as if you were in their office.

To contact a Pennsylvania Gun Trust Lawyer® fill our our Contact form.
May 28, 2008

NFA Trust and Purchase of Class 3 Items

If you live in a city in where the Chief law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) will not or easily sign a Form 4, there are several solutions. Gun Trust, NFA Trust, Jacksonville Gun Lawyer, Florida NFA trust, Class 3 Trust
Class 3 Weapons include suppressors, , short barrel rifles, machine guns, and other destructive devices.

The most common solution is to create a NFA revocable trust to hold title to the firearm or class 3 items. A NFA Gun Trust, Class 3 Firearms Trust, Florida Limited Liability Company, or Florida Corporation is a legal entity established under state law.

For NFA purposes many individuals prefer the a Revocable Trust over a corporation or LLC because the cost is far less on an ongoing basis. Business entities typically have state filing fees of around $150 a year. In addition there are the costs of tax preparation, compliance and filings with the IRS. In Florida and many other states Revocable Trusts like the NFA or Firearms trust do not require any disclosure or public filings. This means the ownership, control, and management is private. Although most Florida Revocable or Living Trusts can hold firearms or other class 3 items, many are not properly setup to deal with the issues involving firearms and other items which are regulated by the National Firearms Act (NFA). If the NFA is violated, the people in possession, and who transferred the items are subject to criminal charges, substantial fines, and forfeiture of not only the class 3 items in question but all firearms in the possession or ownership. ($250,000 penalty, 10 years in prison, and forfeiture of items) The gun or firearms trust must give the Trustee instructions and special powers so that they can legally manage for unplanned events. Weapons and other assets in a Firearms Trust can not be distributed like other assets upon the death or incapacity of the person who placed the items in the trust(The Grantor or Settlor). There are many advantages to a firearms trust, if you own or plan to purchase a class 3 items you should contact a lawyer who is familiar with these issues and can design a trust to protect you and your family from liability. If you are in Florida you can contact me and if you are in another state I would be happy to get you in touch with a lawyer in your state who can provide information on NFA Gun Trusts.
May 27, 2008

Machine Guns and Medicaid

What happens when Grandpa needs to go to a nursing home but he owns a Class 3 Firearm?
A Machine gun is a valuable asset and as such can create a problem with eligibility for nursing home care.  Many veterans were allowed to keep captured machine guns and they want to pass them down to their children or grandchildren.  If that grandparent needs nursing home coverage and they are not married, many states will limit their non-exempt assets to $2000.

Today as machine guns continue to increase in value this can cause a problem for qualifying for Medicaid coverage. 

One solution is to sell the machine gun and put the cash into an exempt asset or use it before applying for coverage.  When the machine gun is wanted to be kept in the family, it is possible to trade it for an exempt asset like a vehicle.

The Class 3 firearm should not be given to a family member, even with proper transfer documentation, because it will be considered a gift and create a period of ineligibility.  For more information on Florida Medicaid Asset Tests or Florida Medicaid planning you should Contact a Florida Estate Planning Lawyer or a Gun Trust Lawyer® who is familiar with Medicaid eligibility.
May 22, 2008

What can happen to someone who has an NFA firearm which is not registered to him?

Violators may be fined up to $250,000, and imprisoned up to 10 years, or both.

In addition, any vessel, vehicle or aircraft used to transport, conceal or possess an unregistered NFA firearm is subject to seizure and forfeiture, as is the weapon itself.
May 21, 2008

What about my unregistered NFA Firearms?

An individual, business, or NFA Firearms trust may not register an unregistered NFA firearm.  Only a manufacture, maker, and importer can register a firearm.

Possession of an unregistered NFA firearms is a crime.  The ATF states that if you are in possession of a contraband firearm, you should contact the nearest ATF office to arrange for its disposition.

WARNING - although this is the advise of the AFT, they also state that mere possession is unlawful
May 20, 2008

What is the EIN for a Gun Trust?

When filling out the Form 4 or opening a bank account of a NFA gun trust, you should use your social security number when anyone asks for and EIN number.

A NFA Gun Trust is a highly customized Revocable Living Trust and as such it does not require an Employment Identification Number (EIN).  Many banks treat all trusts as irrevocable as as such ask for EIN's

If you are opening a bank account, or filling out your form 1 or Form 4 just use your SSN anywhere it asks for an EIN number.
May 19, 2008

Georgia Enhances Right To Carry Law

On May 14th, 2008, Georgia's Governor Sonny Perdue signed legislation which will strengthen Georgia's current right to Carry laws.  This legislation will
  1. allow licensed permit holders to possess a firearm in any private motor vehicle, while on any publicly accessible parking lot;
  2. prohibit gun dealer entrapment schemes like those orchestrated by New York Mayor Bloomberg;
  3. allow concealed carry permit holders to carry in State Parks, recreation areas, wildlife management areas, and public transportation;
  4. create a stricter time limit for various stages of the concealed carry license application process; and
  5. allow concealed carry permit holders to carry in restaurants.
May 18, 2008

How can an individual legally acquire NFA firearms?

Basically, there are 2 ways that an individual (who is not prohibited by Federal, State, or local law from receiving or possessing firearms) may legally acquire NFA firearms:

    1. By transfer after approval by ATF of a registered weapon from its lawful owner residing in the same State as the transferee.

    2. By obtaining prior approval from ATF to make NFA firearms.

[27 CFR 479.62-66 and 479.84-86 ]

In addition, a Corporation, LLC, or Firearms Trust may acquire NFA Firearms that are nor prohibited by Federal, State, or local law.

To create a NFA Trust Contact a Gun Trust Lawyer®

May 14, 2008

Automatic gun transfer nets prison sentence

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has an article on an odd application of the NFA and consequences of an improper transfer. This type of result only furthers support that NFA restricted items should be help in a NFA Gun Trust to help avoid invalid transfers.

The US District Judge said that Olofson, knew that the gun fired automatically and gave it to someone else to use on a shooting range. This is a technical violation of the NFA and could have subjected Olofson to 10 years in jail and $250,000 in penalties.

If you want a Silencer, Short barreled Riffle, or Machine gun and want to protect your family and friends from an accidental transfer or a case involving constructive possession, you should Contact Gun Trust Lawyer® to explain the benefits of using a NFA gun Trust.

May 13, 2008

CNN'S Glen Beck Devotes Week to Guns

Glenn Beck, CNN's multimedia personality, plans to devote both his television and radio programs all week to the Second Amendment and firearms issues. Beck's Web site will carry audio and video clips from what he calls, "Gun Week."

May 9, 2008

National Firearms Act Class 3 Information

This blog is dedicated to providing information to help residents of every state understand the current laws and regulations related to the purchase, sale, possession, and transportation of Guns and other weapons regulated by the NFA. In addition, we will attempt to put you in contact with a lawyer in your state who can help in the purchase, manufacture, possession, or transfer of Silencer, Short-Barreled Rifle, Short Barreled Shotgun, Machine Gun, Destructive Device, or Any Other Weapon regulated by the NFA.

If you are a lawyer in and interested in helping clients in your state preserve their rights to purchase class 3 items please contact us.

If you are interested in a NFA Trust to purchase Class 3 items and would like to find someone to help in the preparation of a Gun Trust you should contact a NFA Gun Trust Lawyer®.

May 8, 2008

Alabama (Al) What NFA Firearms can I own?

NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In Alabama you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Machine Guns
Silencers
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS) (After 7/5/10)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR) (After 7/5/10)
Any Other Weapon (AOW)
Destructive Devices (DD)
In Alabama you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.

Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS) (Before 7/5/10)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR) (Before 7/5/10)

Follow this link to find out more about Alabama and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms

Updated 4/22/2010 SBR/SBR made legal in Alabama under act 2010-496 effective (After 7/5/10)

May 7, 2008

Alaska (AK): What NFA Firearms can I own?

NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In Alaska you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Machine Guns
Silencers
Any Other Weapon (AOW)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)
In Alaska you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.
None

Follow this link to find out more about Alaska and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms

May 6, 2008

Arizona (AZ) What NFA Firearms can I own?

NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In Arizona you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Machine Guns
Silencers
Any Other Weapon (AOW)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)
In Arizona you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.
None

Follow this link to find out more about Arizona and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms

May 5, 2008

Colorado (CO) What NFA Firearms can I own?

Colorado NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In Colorado you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Machine Guns
Silencers
Any Other Weapon (AOW)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)
In Colorado you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.
None

Follow this link to find out more about Colorado and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms

May 4, 2008

National Firearms Act - 26 U.S.C. Chapter 53

THE NATIONAL FIREARMS ACT
TITLE 26, UNITED STATES CODE, CHAPTER 53 INTERNAL REVENUE CODE

The National Firearms Act (NFA) is part of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. All administration and enforcement of the Internal Revenue Code, with the exception of the NFA, is by the Secretary of the Treasury. The ATF administration and enforcement was transferred to the Department of Justice under the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

Teh Attorney General is now in charge of all administration and enforcement of the NFA, were transferred to the Attorney General. The definition in Section 7801(a)(2), Title 26, V.S.C., we changed to provide that references to the term "Secretary" or "Secretary of the Treasury" in the NFA shall mean the Attorney General.

Chapter 53 - Machine Guns, Destructive Devices and Certain other Firearms is broken in to several sections
sub-chapter A Taxes
Part I Special Occupational Taxes

§ 5801 Imposition of Tax
§ 5802 Registration of importers, manufactures, Dealers
Part II - Tax on transferring firearms
§ 5811 Transfer Tax
§ 5812 Transfers
Part III - Tax on making firearms
§ 5821 Making Tax
§ 5822 Making
sub-chapter B General Provisons and Exemptions
Part I - General Provisions
§ 5841 Registration of firearms.
§ 5842 Identification of firearms.
§ 5843 Records and returns.
§ 5844 Importation.
§ 5845 Definitions.
§ 5846 Other laws applicable.
§ 5847 Effect on other laws..
§ 5848 Restrictive use of information.
§ 5849 Citation of chapter.
Part II - Exemptions.
§ 5851 Special (occupational) taxes.
§ 5852 General transfer and making tax exemption.
§ 5853 Transfer and making tax exemption available to certain governmental entities.
§ 5854 Exportation of firearms exempt from transfer tax.
sub-chapter C - Prohibited Acts
§ 5861 Prohibited acts.
sub-chapter D- Penalties and Forfeitures
§ 5871 Penalties.
§ 5872 Forfeitures.
Download The National Firearms Act in PDF

May 4, 2008

Florida (FL) What NFA Firearms can I own?

Florida NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In Florida you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Machine Guns
Silencers
Any Other Weapon (AOW)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)
In Florida you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.
None

Follow this link to find out more about Florida and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms

May 3, 2008

Overview of the National Firearms Act

The National Firearm Act of 1934 was enacted in reaction to activities of gangsters and outlaws of the time. The original law was passed as tax legislation in order to discourage ownership of certain firearms and destructive devices without creating an outright prohibition of the items. The tax on the weapons of $200 was a substantial amount of money in 1934. Because criminals were unlikely to register their NFA weapons, the government was able to use the possession of the weapons without proper tax as a tool to arrest and stop criminal activity. At the time the enforcement of the NFA was the responsibility of the Department of the Treasury.

The National Firearms act controls the ownership, transfer, and possession of a limited set of devices which include machine guns, silencers, short barreled rifles, and short barreled shotguns by requiring federal registration and a tax stamp for each device owned or transferred. The tax stamp is acquired in the registration process and requires specific paperwork. This paperwork referred to as a form 4 or form 1 typically requires a signature of local law enforcement, fingerprints and a payment of the $200 tax. Later the tax on 'any other weapons was changed to $5. The tax is payable at manufacture and each time the NFA device changes ownership except when it is inherited or a dealer acquires the device.

The NFA also required serial numbers on firearms and made it unlawful to alter them. The process had the effect of registering all manufacturers, importers, and dealers.

In 1986, the Firearm Owners Protection Act made the manufacture of new machine guns for the non-government agencies illegal. Machine guns manufactured prior to 1986 can continue to be bought and sold. The limited supply of these devices has cause the prices to rise on a yearly basis.

Currently the National Firearms Act is administered by the National Firearms Act Branch of the BATFE or the ATF as it is often referred to.

May 3, 2008

AFT National Firearms Act Handbook

ATF_NFA_COVER.gifThe National Firearms Act (NFA) Handbook is available to download.

The NFA Handbook is not available in a printed version any more You may download the entire book (9MB) or its individual chapters

May 2, 2008

Delaware (DE) What NFA Firearms can I own?

Delaware NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In Delaware you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Any Other Weapon (AOW)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)
In Delaware you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.
Machine Guns
Silencers
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)

Follow this link to find out more about Delaware and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms

May 1, 2008

Georgia (GA) What NFA Firearms can I own?

Georgia NFA Class 3 firearms
There are several type of Class 3 items that are restricted by the National Firearms Act.

Each state can impose additional restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of class 3 firearms in addition to the compliance that is required with the national Firearms Act.

In Georgia you can own the following items that are regulated the the National Firearms Act

Machine Guns
Silencers
Any Other Weapon (AOW)
Destructive Devices (DD)
Short Barreled Shotguns (SBS)
Short Barreled Rifles (SBR)
In Georgia you cannot own the following NFA restricted items.
None

Follow this link to find out more about Georgia and NFA restrictions on Class 3 Firearms